#Chem 162-2008 exam III review draft 2

#Chem 162-2008 exam III review draft 2 - CHEMISTRY 162-2008...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
CHEMISTRY 162-2008 EXAM III REVIEW SESSION DR. ED TAVSS Third hourly exam: Wed., 4/23, 9:40 – 11:00 PM Review Part I: Wednesday, April 16 th , CDL 102, 8 – 10 PM Chapter 16.6: Complex ions Chapter 22.7-9: Coordination chemistry Chapter 17.1-7: Thermodynamics Review Part II: Thursday, April 17 th , CDL 109, 8 – 10 PM Chapter 18.1-18.6: Electrochemistry CHEM162-2008 Exam III review session 1
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
CHAPTER 16 APPLICATIONS OF AQUEOUS EQUILIBRIA Complex Ion Equilibria CHEM162-2008 Exam III review session 2
Background image of page 2
CHEM162-2008 Exam III review session 3 CHAPTER 16: COMPLEX ION EQUILIBRIA
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
CHEM162-2008 Exam III review session 4 PERIODIC TABLE AND PERIODIC PROPERTIES
Background image of page 4
Z&Z 15-99 (modified with fictitious data) ET: A complex ion consists of a central metal cation (Lewis acid), usually a transition metal, to which ligands (Lewis bases, e.g., Cl - , CN - , NH 3 , H 2 O) are tightly attached. ET: Complex ion formation is sequential reactions with ligands on transition metal ions, with large K’s. ET: Note that K f stands for the formation constant of a complex ion; hence the equilibrium equation is always: M + Ligand → Complex ion Complex ion: Species where the transition metal ion is surrounded by ligands. When aqueous KI is added gradually to mercury(II) nitrate, an orange precipitate forms. Continued addition of KI causes the precipitate to dissolve. Write balanced equations to explain these observations. (Hint: Hg 2+ reacts with I - to form HgI 4 2- .) What is the overall formation constant for HgI 4 2- ? Use K f1 = 0.2 x 10 4 , K f2 = 6.5 x 10 10 , K f3 = 7.6 x 10 7 and K f4 = 0.1 x 10 9 . Hg 2+ = a solution Hg 2+ + I - HgI + , a soluble complex ion K f1 = 0.2 x 10 4 HgI + + I - HgI 2 , an orange precipitate K f2 = 6.5 x 10 10 HgI 2 + I - HgI 3 - , a soluble complex ion K f3 = 7.6 x 10 7 HgI 3 - + I - HgI 4 2- , a soluble complex ion K f4 = 0.1 x 10 9 Hg 2+ (aq) + 4I - (aq) HgI 4 2- (aq) K f = 9.9 x 10 29 CHEM162-2008 Exam III review session 5
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Chem 162-2003 Quiz 3 Version A1 2. How many moles of AgI will dissolve in 1.00 L of a 3.00M KSCN solution if K sp (AgI) = 1.5 x 10 -16 and K f ([Ag(SCN) 4 ] 3- ) = 1.2 x 10 10 ? AgI Ag + + I - K sp = 1.5 x 10 -16 Ag + + 4SCN - Ag(SCN) 4 3- K f = 1.2 x 10 10 AgI(s) + 4SCN - I - + Ag(SCN) 4 3- K = 1.8 x 10 -6 AgI(s) + 4SCN - (aq) I - (aq)+ Ag(SCN) 4 3- (aq) Initial Y 3.00 0 0 Change -X -4X +X +X Equilibrium Y-X 3.00 - 4X +X +X ([I - ][Ag(SCN) 4 3- ])/[SCN - ] 4 = 1.8 x 10 -6 ([X][X])/(3.00 - 4X) 4 = 1.8 x 10 -6 Use small K rule. X 2 /(3.00) 4 = 1.8 x 10 -6 X = 0.0121 M 0.0121 moles AgI will dissolve in 1 liter CHEM162-2008 Exam III review session 6
Background image of page 6
CHAPTER 22 CHAPTER 22 Coordination Compound Fundamentals Coordination Compound Fundamentals Ligand (L: ligo, to bind): A substance (neutral or anionic) having a lone electron pair that bonds to a transition metal cation (i.e., Lewis base-Lewis acid interaction) Complex ion: Transition metal cation + ligands Usually, but not always, a transition metal; usually a cation, but could be an anion or neutral. Coordination compound (Transition) metal cation + ligands + counterions Complex ion Coordination compound dissociation in aqueous solution: [Co(NH 3 ) 5 Cl]Cl 2 → [Co(NH 3 ) 5 Cl] 2+ + 2Cl - Ligands are much more tightly attached to the metal cation than the counterions. The ligands are tightly attached to the counter ion (covalent bonds), whereas the counterions move freely around the solution (weaker ion-dipole bonds with solvent).
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 8
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 54

#Chem 162-2008 exam III review draft 2 - CHEMISTRY 162-2008...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 8. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online