Biol 201 - Notes - 4.6.09

Biol 201 - Notes - 4.6.09 - Mutualisms of a Plant Three...

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Mutualisms of a Plant Three main areas: roots, shoots, leaves - Water and nutrient uptake - Defending against herbivory - Pollination and seed dispersal What can plants offer to other species? - Carbohydrates Water and nutrient uptake (Resource Exchange) Legumes and N-fixing bacteria ( rhizobia ) - Used by farmers to enrich soil Most plants don’t have rhizobia, but they DO have  Mycorrhizae - 90% of plants have associations between their roots and some type of fungi Two major fungal types: - Arubuscular mycorrhizal fungi ( AMF ) - Ectomycorrhizal fungi ( ECM ) - Thread like filaments called  hyphae Variations in mutualism Mutualist species vary in - Degree of benefit provided - Size of cost they impose And these can vary with environment Should a plant provide more C to a fungus: - When the plant is in the sun or the shade? -
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This note was uploaded on 09/24/2009 for the course BIOL 201 taught by Professor Mitchell during the Spring '07 term at UNC.

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Biol 201 - Notes - 4.6.09 - Mutualisms of a Plant Three...

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