ch06 - Foundations of Business Intelligence Databases and...

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Unformatted text preview: Foundations of Business Intelligence Databases and Information management: accurate, timely and relevant info • NASCAR races to manage its data – Stock Car: _ – American most popular spectator sport • 75 million people attended race in 2005 – The highest number of attendees of any sport • Second in television rating – NFL • 2.1 billions sales on licensed merchandise – Grow NASCAR’s fan base even more • Need right data to identify who its fans are • Data are housed in many disparate database – NASCAR.com – NASCAR members club – Each driver’s fan club • Data are not in a consistent manner – Need to be “cleansed” » discrepancies, inconsistencies, errors – Consolidated fan database • Create customer intimacy – Rule for using data • Fans are not bombarded • Privacy agreements are respected Contents 6.1 Traditional file environment 6.2 The database approach to data management 6.3 Using databases to improve business performance and decision making 6.4 Managing data resources Traditional File Environment • Data hierarchy – Bit – Byte – Word – Field – Record – File – Database: a group of related files • Entity – Record – Information maintained • Personnel, order, … • Attribute – Field – Characteristic or quality describe entity • Name, Social security number, birthday, … • Key field: an field can uniquely identify an record Problems with traditional files • Most organizations grow info system independently to its functions – Each application has its own files and programs • Multiple master files created, maintained – Difficult to maintain • Multiple master files – Created – Maintained – Operated by separate divisions or departments • Years later, no one knows – What data they use – Who is using the data Problems with traditional files • Data redundancy and confusion • Program-data dependency • Lack of flexibility • Poor security • Lack of data sharing and availability • Data Redundancy and confusion – Different divisions collect the same data • Customers – Sales – Account receivable – Service – Data inconsistency • Different coding to represent the same value – XL, extra large, extra-large • Program-Data dependency – Coupling of stored data and programs which update and maintain those data • Traditional program need to specify location and nature of data – Ex: Customer Master File • Column 1 – 4: Customer number • Column 5-25: Name • Column 26-32: Phone Number • …… – Changes in telephone numbers • 7 digits to 8 digits – Define data format » Column 1 – 4: Customer number » Column 5-25: Name » Column 26-3 3 : Phone Number » …… – Require updates on all the programs which access the telephone numbers • Lack of Flexibility – Traditional systems deliver routine scheduled reports – Can NOT deliver ad hoc reports – Can not respond to unanticipated information requirement In a timely manner •...
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This note was uploaded on 09/24/2009 for the course CSIS 2500 taught by Professor Parvaz during the Spring '08 term at Langara.

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ch06 - Foundations of Business Intelligence Databases and...

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