Sel_Ch12 - SOLUTIONSTOSELECTEDPROBLEMSCHAPTER12...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
SOLUTIONS TO SELECTED PROBLEMS CHAPTER 12 Exercise 12-14  (30 minutes) 1. The relevant costs of a hunting trip would be: Travel expense (100 kilometres @ $0.25 per kilometre). $25 Shotgun shells. ................................................................ 20 Coffee beans. ..................................................................   20     Total. ................................................................................ $65 This answer assumes that Bill would not be drinking the coffee anyway. It also  assumes that the resale values of the camper, pickup truck, and boat are not  affected by taking one more hunting trip. The money lost in the poker game is not relevant because Bill would have  played poker even if he did not go hunting. He plays poker every weekend. The other costs are sunk at the point at which the decision is made to go on  another hunting trip. 2. If Bill gets lucky and bags another two ducks, all of his costs are likely to be  about the same as they were on his last trip. Therefore, it really doesn’t cost  him anything to shoot the last two ducks—except possibly the costs for extra  shotgun shells. The costs are really incurred in order to be able to hunt ducks  and would be the same whether one, two, three, or a dozen ducks were  actually shot. All of the costs, with the possible exception of the costs of the  shotgun shells, are basically fixed with respect to how many ducks are  actually bagged during any one hunting trip. 3. In a decision of whether to give up hunting entirely, more of the costs listed by  John are relevant. If Bill did not hunt, he would not need to pay for: gas, oil,  and tires; shotgun shells; the hunting license; and the coffee. Assuming Bill  would not be drinking the coffee anyway. In addition, he would be able to sell  his camper, equipment, boat, and possibly pickup truck, the proceeds of  which would be considered relevant in this decision. The original costs of  these items are not relevant, but their resale values are relevant.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Exercise 12-14  (continued) These three requirements illustrate the slippery nature of costs. A cost that is  relevant in one situation can be irrelevant in the next. None of the costs— except possibly the cost of the shotgun shells—are relevant when we  compute the cost of bagging a particular duck; some of them are relevant  when we compute the cost of a hunting trip; and more of them are relevant  when we consider the possibility of giving up hunting. Exercise 12-16
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 13

Sel_Ch12 - SOLUTIONSTOSELECTEDPROBLEMSCHAPTER12...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online