Week2_summaries

Week2_summaries - Uyen Pham CAT 3 WEEK 2 SUMMARIES I....

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Unformatted text preview: Uyen Pham CAT 3 WEEK 2 SUMMARIES I. Cameraless Animation I I. Introduction: Comedy and the I r responsible Self I I I. My Neighbor Totoro IV. Air Guitar I. Cameraless Animation We typically think of animation technology that provides the illusion of moving images as based on creating images on movie film, the history of animation predates the invention of photography. Other technologies that we commonly associate with entertainment, such as the phonograph, were originally invented to serve other purposes (Edison did not even consider playing music as one of the primary applications of the phonograph). But animation served no other purposes; its motivation was purely for entertainment. The first known animation device was called the thaumatrope. While this device did not actually produce imaged which moved over time, it combined two images to create the illusion of a single image. This device relied on a feature of perception known as the persistence of vision, which underlies almost all commonly used techniques for animation to this day. The phenakistoscope was the first device that provided the illusion of continual motion. I t used a disk with a series of equally spaced images and viewing slits, through which one sights the images as they move by. This same basic technique was used in several later devices, and movie projectors ultimately use the same approach, except the image is projected through the slit (the shutter) instead of the viewer looking through. The phenakistoscope used a single disk, or two disks in parallel, which were spun on their centers. The zoetrope use a spinning drum. The praxinoscope used a spinning set of mirrors instead of a series of slits. Each new device improved the capabilities of the previous, such as increasing the number of images and thus the length of motion. All of these devices produced a moving image that repeated continuously. The flip book, one of the simplest approaches to animation, was the first technique that presented animation as a single non-repeating moving image. The flip book simple uses a sequence of images on successive pages of a pad or book of paper, each image with a small change from the previous one. Flipping through the pages at a constant rate (as much as possible) provides the illusion of motion....
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Week2_summaries - Uyen Pham CAT 3 WEEK 2 SUMMARIES I....

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