Lab1 - PA#1 Getting Started with the Windows Research...

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1 PA#1: Getting Started with the Windows Research Kernel (WRK) and VirtualBox Monday August 31, 2009 Due Thurs Sept 10 11am Worth 5% of your grade in cs4414 You must do this assignment by yourself Expected duration: 3 hours The purpose of this hands-on lab is to gain experience using, compiling, and modifying the Windows Research Kernel (WRK). The basic idea is that you will: Install VirtualBox, an x86 virtualization platform that runs on Windows, Linux, Macintosh, etc. Create a virtual machine running Windows Server 2003 Modify the WRK source code, recompile your kernel, install your new kernel, and confirm that your changes are executed. You have options regarding how to perform this lab: Host (physical) machine is Windows 7, Windows Vista, or Windows XP Host (physical) machine is Linux or MacOS Edit and compile WRK source using Visual Studio on the Host (physical) machine This is the recommended option, as Visual Studio is an excellent IDE. Install Visual Studio as necessary (it is free for students) Not possible. Consider using the CS machines in Olsson 001 (and Visual Studio) and an external flash-based drive. This is a good option. Edit and compile WRK source using a text editor (such as Emacs or VI) on the Host (physical) machine Only use this option if you don’t want to install Visual Studio or you do not have enough disk space for Visual Studio. Not possible to compile. Edit and compile WRK source using Visual Studio on the Guest (virtual) machine Good option if you do not have enough space on the hard drive of the Host (physical) machine. This is the recommended option. Edit and compile WRK source using a text editor (such as Emacs or VI) on the Guest (virtual) machine Possible, although the Vistual Studio IDE makes things easier (e.g., Intellisense) Can be done entirely inside the virtual machine. This is a good option. Irrespective of the options above, the virtual machine hard drive can be stored on the hard drive of the Host (physical) machine or on a flash-based drive (such as SD card or USB drive). If there is not enough available disk space on the Host (physical) machine, then an 8GB drive should be purchased. Even if there is enough available disk space on the Host (physical) machine, an external drive can be considered if portability is necessary/desired. Note, however, that if a flash-based drive is used, be careful to always “safely remove” the device, and furthermore (of course) be careful to not lose the device (if you lose this device, you can always follow these instructions to re-create your virtual machine). It is expected that the physical machine you are using has at least 2G RAM (512 MB will be used by the virtual machine) and that there is at least 8GB disk available (4GB will be used by the virtual machine;
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2 note that this can be from the hard drive of the computer or from a SD card or USB drive). If you use an SD card or USB drive, make sure to always “safely remove” it from the physical machine! We will use DreamSpark (
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This note was uploaded on 09/25/2009 for the course CS 4124 taught by Professor Marty during the Spring '09 term at UVA.

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Lab1 - PA#1 Getting Started with the Windows Research...

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