9_Special_Senses_and_Review_Koeberle

9_Special_Senses_and_Review_Koeberle - Central Sulcus...

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Unformatted text preview: Central Sulcus Visual areas of Cerebral Cortex Anterior Posterior Primary Visual Cortex and Visual Association Areas Visual Integration with Somatosensory Information Eye Movements * 40% of Cortex is involved in some form of visual integration. Vision: The Dominant Sense Frontal Lobe Parietal lobe Occipital Lobe Temporal Lobe Visual Integration with Auditory and Limbic Information Retina Optic nerve 1) Refractive Media- elements that focus light on the retina 2) Neural Detection and Transmission to brain Two Elements of Vision Cornea Lens Iris Pigmented Aperture that controls the amount of light that enters the eye Photoreceptors Bipolar Cells RGCs Optic Nerve (II) Light The Neural Retina- lines the back of the eye- Photoreceptors detect light- Retinal Ganglion Cells (RGCs) send their axons out of eye to form the Optic Nerve (output from the retina to the LGN of the Thalamus )- carries sensory information from the retina to the LGN Transverse Section Of Retina Primary Visual Cortex- receives visual information from the contralateral (opposite) visual field of each retina Optic Chiasm- Only the NASAL fibers (closest to the nose) from each retina cross over to the contralateral (opposite) side of the brain- TEMPORAL fibers remain ipsilateral Primary Visual Cortex- receives visual information from the contralateral (opposite) visual field of each retina Lesion of the Optic Nerve- leads to blindness in that eye Lesion Separate Visual Fields R L Primary Visual Cortex- receives visual information from the contralateral (opposite) visual field of each retina Lesion of the Optic Chiasm- a lesion along the midline of...
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This note was uploaded on 09/25/2009 for the course ANATOMY ana300y1 taught by Professor Wiley during the Winter '09 term at University of Toronto.

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9_Special_Senses_and_Review_Koeberle - Central Sulcus...

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