7 - Copyright 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada...

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Unformatted text preview: Copyright 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited. 7-1 Chapter 7 Chapter 7 Gender Inequality: Gender Inequality: Economic and Economic and Political Aspects Political Aspects by Monica Boyd by Monica Boyd Copyright 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited. 7-2 INTRODUCTION INTRODUCTION Will examine: Explanations for gender inequality Gender inequality in the home, the labour force, and politics Recommendations for reducing gender inequality* Copyright 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited. 7-3 GENDER INEQUALITY GENDER INEQUALITY Social roles : Behaviours expected of people occupying particular social positions In 20 th century, enormous change in attitudes, expectations, behaviours, and social roles of men and women in Canada But persistence of gender inequalities : Hierarchical asymmetries between women and men in terms of distribution of power, material wellbeing, and prestige* Copyright 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited. 7-4 GENDER STEREOTYPES GENDER STEREOTYPES Gender inequality is reinforced by gender stereotypes : Set of prejudicial biologically-based generalizations about men and women in terms of personality traits and behaviour Persistence of polarized gender stereotypes is supported by research Yet , gender-related identities and behaviours largely socially constructed and continually altered through social Copyright 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited. 7-5 GENDER STEREOTYPES GENDER STEREOTYPES Socially constructed nature of gender identities means gender identities: Are not stable or fixed Need not be congruent with sex assigned at birth Are not polar opposites (despite notion of opposite sex), but can operate on a continuum of masculinity and femininity* Copyright 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited. 7-6 DIMENSIONS OF INEQUALITY: DIMENSIONS OF INEQUALITY: POWER, MATERIAL WELLBEING, POWER, MATERIAL WELLBEING, AND PRESTIGE AND PRESTIGE 1. Power : Capacity to impose your will on others, regardless of any resistance 1. Material wellbeing : Involves access to economic resources required to pay for necessities of life and other possessions and advantages 1. Prestige : Average evaluation of occupational activities and positions arranged in a hierarchy* Copyright 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited. 7-7 EXPLAINING GENDER EXPLAINING GENDER INEQUALITY INEQUALITY Feminism : Body of knowledge about causes and nature of womens subordination to men in society, and various agendas - often involving political action - for removing that subordination Feminist theories: 1. Liberal feminism 1. Marxist feminism 1. Sot feminism* Copyright 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited....
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7 - Copyright 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada...

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