1 - Chapter 1 Introducing Sociology by Robert Brym

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 Copyright © 2008 by Nelson, a division of  Thomson Canada Limited.  1-1 Chapter 1 Chapter 1 Introducing Sociology Introducing Sociology by Robert Brym by Robert Brym
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 Copyright © 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited.   1-2 INTRODUCTION INTRODUCTION Will examine: Sociological perspective Durkheim’s theory of suicide and suicide  in Canada today Sociological imagination Origins of sociology, and  Main sociological theories*
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 Copyright © 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited.   1-3 SOCIOLOGY SOCIOLOGY Sociology Systematic study of human behaviour in  social context Emerged during Industrial Revolution : Era of massive social transformation  accompanied by new social problems*
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 Copyright © 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited.   1-4 THE SOCIOLOGICAL THE SOCIOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE PERSPECTIVE Sociological perspective examines  association between social events and  social relations Classic 19  century example    Durkheim’s analysis of suicide: Examined association between suicide  rates and social relations Demonstrated that suicide rates are  strongly influenced by social forces*
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 Copyright © 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited.   1-5 SUICIDE RATES, SELECTED SUICIDE RATES, SELECTED COUNTRIES COUNTRIES
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 Copyright © 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited.   1-6 DURKHEIM’S FINDINGS DURKHEIM’S FINDINGS Some categories of people (men,  Christians, the unmarried, seniors) had  higher rates of suicide than others  (women, Jews, the married, the young  and middle-aged) Married adults half as likely as unmarried  adults to commit suicide Jews less likely to commit suicide than  Christians*
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 Copyright © 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited.   1-7 Social solidarity : Degree to which group  member share beliefs and values, and  intensity and frequency of interaction Demonstrated variation in social solidarity in  different groups: Those weakly integrated into social groups  are more likely to commit suicide   As level of social solidarity  increases,  suicide rate declines But beyond a certain point, rate begins to  DURKHEIM’S THEORY DURKHEIM’S THEORY OF SUICIDE OF SUICIDE
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 Copyright © 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited.   1-8 Three types of suicide: 1. Anomic suicide : Occurs in low social  solidarity settings, where norms governing  behaviour are vaguely defined   1. Egoistic suicide : Results from lack of 
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This note was uploaded on 09/25/2009 for the course SOCIOLOGY SOC101Y1 taught by Professor Tepperman during the Winter '09 term at University of Toronto- Toronto.

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1 - Chapter 1 Introducing Sociology by Robert Brym

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