ESL151-LectureNotes#2

ESL151-LectureNotes#2 - PERSUASIVE/ARGUMENT ESSAYS O...

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PERSUASIVE/ARGUMENT ESSAYS ORGANIZATION (OUTLINE) O I. Introduction A. Hook - get the attention of your reader B. Topic Introduction/Background - You need to introduce the topic and the sides of the issue to your reader. Include the reading summary as part of this. If your reading doesn't present both sides, make sure you add the other side of the issue. C. Thesis - clearly state the issue and your position on it I. Body Paragraph Argument #1 (in Topic Sentence) A. Explanation of Argument B. Evidence #1: C. Explanation of Evidence #1/Connection of Evidence to argument D. Evidence #2: E. Explanation of Evidence #2/Connection of Evidence to argument: F. Concluding Sentence (Ties up paragraph and/or transitions to next paragraph): I. Body Paragraph – Argument # 2 (in Topic Sentence) A. Explanation of Argument B. Evidence #1: C. Explanation of Evidence #1/Connection of Evidence to argument D. Evidence #2: E. Explanation of Evidence #2/Connection of Evidence to argument: F. Concluding Sentence (Ties up paragraph and/or transitions to next paragraph): I. Body Paragraph – Argument # 3 (in Topic Sentence) A. Explanation of Argument B. Evidence #1: C. Explanation of Evidence #1/Connection of Evidence to argument D. Evidence #2: E. Explanation of Evidence #2/Connection of Evidence to argument: F. Concluding Sentence (Ties up paragraph and/or transitions to next paragraph): I. Conclusion A. Summary of Arguments/Restate Thesis: B. Final Thought:
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The Body Paragraphs Lecture Notes What is a paragraph? One of the central components of a paper is the paragraph. When most students think of a paragraph, they hold onto the old myths about length: a paragraph is at least 5 sentences, a paragraph is half a page, etc. A paragraph, however, is "a group of sentences or a single sentence that forms a unit" (Lunsford and Connors,116). Length or appearance is not a factor in determining whether a section in a paper is a paragraph. In fact, it is not the number of sentences that construct a paragraph, but it is the unity and coherence of ideas among those sentences that makes a paragraph a paragraph. For instance, in some styles of writing, particularly journalistic styles, a paragraph can be one sentence. As long as that sentence expresses the paper's central idea, that sentence can serve the function of a paragraph. Ultimately, strong paragraphs contain a sentence or sentences unified around one central, controlling idea. When the paragraph reaches completion it should serve to bring the reader into your paper and guide his/her understanding of what has been read. Whether that completion happens with one sentence or with twenty, the end result is still a paragraph. How do I decide what to put in a paragraph?
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This note was uploaded on 09/26/2009 for the course ESL 151 taught by Professor Carr,k during the Spring '09 term at Glendale Community College.

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ESL151-LectureNotes#2 - PERSUASIVE/ARGUMENT ESSAYS O...

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