ESL151-LectureNotes - Office: VGT 5B Office Hours: Tuesdays...

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Office: VGT 5B Office Hours: Tuesdays 3:00-4:20 p.m. 20. Word Choice Error 4 The following contains no word choice errors. "Even though innoculations prevent children from contracting deadly diseases, but parents should avoid vaccinating their children." 6. Paragraph Development "I like cats. Cats are cute. Do you have a cat? Meow." The above sentences are an example of. .. A. stringy writing B. choppy writing C. unity D. a hasty generalization E. missing the point
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Word Choice Lecture Notes Note! Improving one’s vocabulary is not an easy task. However, regular reading of English truly benefits your language skills. Try spending a few minutes per day reading English. You may also wish to enroll in a reading/vocabulary course such as ESL 146 to help you build these skills. What are these notes about. .. W how to revise your papers for word-level clarity h how to eliminate wordiness and avoid clichés h how to find words that best express your ideas h how to choose words that suit an academic audience h how to engage particular strategies and questions to clarify your writing Introduction If you frequently receive feedback with words like "unclear," "too idiomatic," or "too poetic" on the score/grade form or on the margins of your graded papers, these are the lecture notes for you. Keep in mind that these notes are intended for use during the revision process. Finding the right words is fundamentally an issue of word choice, which means first locating what’s not quite right with original choices. Revising for word choice is not about prettifying your writing or sounding sophisticated; it is about expressing your ideas clearly and effectively. As you read further into these notes, keep in mind that it can take more time to "save" words from the original sentence than to write
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a brand new sentence to convey the same meaning or idea. Don’t be too attached to what you’ve already written; if you are willing to start a sentence fresh you may be able to chose words with greater clarity. I. Increasing Clarity by Eliminating Wordiness: So you write a paper that makes perfect sense to you, but it comes back with "unclear" scribbled throughout the margins. Why, you wonder, are instructors so fond of the term "unclear"? If they had difficulty comprehending the sentence, rather than rewrite it for you, they jot down a marker like "unclear" to encourage you to rewrite it more clearly. Remember, just because you understand your writing, this does not mean that the reader (audience) also understands it. For your reader to understand your writing, YOU must choose the correct words. How does a sentence get cloudy despite our desire for clarity? Our writing can become unclear in a variety of ways, including: w misused terms, e.g.: "I sprayed the ants in their ‘private places.’" m unclear pronouns, e.g.: "My cousin Jake hugged my brother Trey, even though he didn’t like him very much." T misused words, e.g.: "Cree Indians were a monotonous culture until French and British settlers arrived." u
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This note was uploaded on 09/26/2009 for the course ESL 151 taught by Professor Carr,k during the Spring '09 term at Glendale Community College.

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ESL151-LectureNotes - Office: VGT 5B Office Hours: Tuesdays...

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