ANTH201 Research Paper.docx - 1 Manliguez Anthony Manliguez Professor Ward Anthropology 201g Principles on Human Organization Globalization The K\u0101naka

ANTH201 Research Paper.docx - 1 Manliguez Anthony Manliguez...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 15 pages.

1 Manliguez Anthony Manliguez Professor Ward Anthropology 201g: Principles on Human Organization December 10, 2019 Globalization: The Kānaka Maoli ’s Decline in Health In the Polynesian islands live the Kānaka Maoli , the aboriginal people of Mokupuni o Hawai’i , also known as the Hawaiian Islands in English. These islands were a popular stop for voyaging Europeans and Americans in the 16 th century, most of whom were on their way to Asia. The rich nature and land of Hawai’i allowed wealthy businessmen, mainly from Europe and America, to build sugar plantations which exploited the Kānaka Maoli ’s ancient land. Unfortunately this theme of exploitation only continues with the invasion of the Hawaiian Islands by the United States in the 1890s. Since then, the Kānaka Maoli have suffered plenty under the hands of foreign forces. This paper will examine the effects of globalization on the Kānaka Maoli , the Native Hawaiians, specifically by American colonists, such as the effects of westernization and globalization on health issues amongst the Kānaka Maoli population. Background Information The Hawaiian Islands have suffered many tragedies in the hands of colonists, but before the Kānaka Maoli were a thriving group of individuals who flourished in their tropical environment. The Hawaiian Islands, or now most commonly referred to as simply “Hawai’i”, are now collectively presented in the media as a holiday getaway or most prominently a honeymoon destination, but before it was a state within the United States of America, the native people of the Kānaka Maoli thrived in their own culture, devoid of the corruption that westernization brought. In fact, mere centuries before Christopher Columbus stumbled upon America and Captain Cook
Image of page 1
2 Manliguez discovered Hawai’i, people from the Polynesian islands arrived in Hawai’i. Anthropologists have determined that the Kānaka Maoli voyaged to the Hawaiian Islands from the Marquesas about five hundred years after the birth of Christ. Shortly after, smaller waves of Polynesian voyagers came to settle in other islands in the archipelago. These groups of people from various islands are the people who developed and evolved to become the Kānaka Maoli as we know them today. These people made these islands their home, and they lived “undisturbed, in communal self- sufficiency, for hundreds of years” (Menton and Tamura, 1999). Once the Westerners arrived in 1778 in their seemingly gigantic ships, life for the Native Hawaiians would never return to how it was before. When Captain Cook first found the archipelago, each island had their own superior, mostly consisting of over-seeing chiefs. In 1840, a written constitution for the Kingdom of Hawai’i was developed, signaling the first tangible American and British influence over the islands. Resembling Western constitutions, the government established the rights of the people and separated its power into the three branches of executive, judicial, and legislative that are seen today in the United States. Invoking the will of the Christian God and providing political power
Image of page 2
Image of page 3

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 15 pages?

  • Spring '05
  • Ward
  • Native Hawaiians, Kanaka Maoli

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture