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Sex and Gender (2.1)

Sex and Gender (2.1) - Sex Roles Gender Roles and...

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Sex Roles, Gender Roles, and Communication I. Introduction a. Sex: Biological Categories i. Male (penis) ii. Female (vagina) b. Gender: Social/Cultural Categories i. Masculine ii. Feminine c. Biological sex is a poor predictor of communication differences d. The critical issue is not sex-traits, but gender-role traits and stereotypes II. Defining Gender Roles a. Gender Roles: i. Normative expectations about the division of labor between the sexes; 1. Normative Expectations : Societal expectations about how to act “properly” or “normally” ii. Gender -related rules about behavior and communication that exist within particular cultural-social-historical context 1. change with time iii. If there are any gender -driven behaviors in communication they are: 1. they’re not large 2. overwhelmed by social and cultural things 3. they do not favor one sex over the other 4. Gender-role norms for: body type, how to dress, etc a. Men holding the door open b. Men “bring home the bacon” c. How to walk, communicate, dress, etc III. Gender Role Personality Traits a. Men and women do tend to have different gender-role personality traits b. These traits bias how we behave and communicate c. Two different gender–roll personality traits i. Instrumental: Self direction, self assertion, goal orientation, control, independence, decisiveness 1. more tended by men (via biology) ii. Expressive : Interpersonal orientation and emotional characteristics, such as kindness, sensitivity to others, and need for affiliation 1. More tended by women (via biology) iii. WRONG ASSUMPTION! 1. Boys/Men are 100% Instrumentalism 2. Girls/Women are 100% Expressiveness 3. It’s wrong to say that the more instrumental you are, the less expressive you are, and vice versa.
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