Politeness Theory (2.3)

Politeness Theory (2.3) - Politeness Theory I II III...

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Politeness Theory I. Introduction a. Social interaction has a built-in bias toward solidarity i. …toward maximizing expressions of friendliness/affiliation and minimizing conflict/discord II. Origins: Erving Goffman a. The “self” is sacred i. The most important norms in our culture have to do with how individuals are treated ii. Peoples’ “selves” are supposed to be treated with honor and respect b. Our culture has devised communicative rituals that help preserved the sacredness of the “self” i. Forms of avoidance: What should not be done 1. Don’t violate privacy, honor, etc. ii. Forms of presentation: What should be done 1. saying ‘thank you’ iii. Goffman called these rituals “facework” III. Brown and Levinson: Politeness theory a. There are ritual constraints on interaction i. When you are talking, there are things that you feel you need to do b. Face Threatening Acts (FTAs) : Any action that is hostile, disrespectful, imposing i. Threaten others’ “self” or “face”
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This note was uploaded on 04/02/2008 for the course COMM 101 taught by Professor Lieberman during the Fall '07 term at Rutgers.

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Politeness Theory (2.3) - Politeness Theory I II III...

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