HIST 200 Lecture (4.16.2007)

HIST 200 Lecture (4.16.2007) - HIST-200 Lecture 4/16/2007...

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HIST-200 Lecture 4/16/2007 Today: Foreign Policy and Civil Rights Tension through the 1950s. John Foster Dulles: there was threat of massive retaliation . Brinkmanship: we will oppose Soviets right down to the brink of war. Foreign policy doesn’t change much. Soviet Union perceived as a real danger, nuclear weapons were a real danger. 1954: we put “one nation under God” into flag salute… just to further differentiate us from the “godless” Soviets, and that God was on our side. 1955: “In God we trust” on our coins. Problems in the Suez Canal. Hungarian Revolt that is brutally suppressed. Things lighten up with the Soviet Union because Joseph Stalin dies. Collective leadership emerges, but we don’t know much about it. Nikita Khrushchev: conceded that nuclear war would be irrational, talked about the non-inevitability (not inevitable) that the U.S. and Soviet Union would go to war against each other, talks about peaceful coexistence, very much a communist, we will confront him over Cuban missiles. Vietnam becomes critical to American foreign policy, we see it as another facet of the Cold War. Indochina - All of Vietnam + Laos + Cambodia o French colony all the way down to WWII - There is rebellion led by Ho Chi Minh o Leads an internal movement against French colonial authority Guerrilla warfare - French are supported by the United States
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HIST 200 Lecture (4.16.2007) - HIST-200 Lecture 4/16/2007...

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