HIST 200 Lecture (2.14.2007)

HIST 200 Lecture (2.14.2007) - HIST-200 Lecture 2.14.2007...

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HIST-200 Lecture 2.14.2007 Last time: election of 1800 - Important: notion of legitimacy of opposition (peaceful transition of power from differing political parties) Jefferson - some are critical on his stance on slavery - some are critical of his partisanship o turns on his friend, John Adams o o “flip-flopping” on issues - Disconnects state from religion - Leading American architect, student of agriculture, knows several foreign languages, lays out the U of VA campus - Forever in debt (died in debt) o One reason why he could not free his slaves Also did not free them because it was “political suicide” and they were mortgaged property But Jefferson is still conflicted about slavery: “Slavery is like having a wolf by the ears.” Had a liaison with one of his slaves Sets precedent for no slavery in Northwest Territory, but not in the Louisiana Territory 2 Things in Domestic Affairs - Deals with Supreme Court and third branch - John Marshall: elected to be Supreme Justice of the Supreme Court - Supreme court, through Marshall, emerges as viable third branch of government - first case in 1803: Marbury v. Madison - at dispute: who has the power to decide the constitutionality of a given law or of a given action - Marshall declares that the judicial government had right to say what the right is and to say whether a given law or action is repugnant to the Constitution and be deemed “unconstitutional” - establishes precedent to allow the Supreme Court to be the final
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HIST 200 Lecture (2.14.2007) - HIST-200 Lecture 2.14.2007...

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