Econ 366 - Chapter 4

Econ 366 - Chapter 4 - Chapter 4 Trends in Sizes and...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 4 Trends in Sizes and Structures of Urban areas
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Principal issues 1. Sizes of Urban Areas : varies from many millions in largest cities (NY or LA) to few thousands in small towns (Broken Bow, Nebraska or Monroeville, Alabama) 1. Suburbanization : dispersion of urban population from the city centers to the peripheries – important urban phenomenon of 20 th century
Background image of page 2
Sizes of US Urban Areas 1990 1980 1970 1790 1890 1970 1990 NY 1 1 1 49 2507 7896 7323 LA 2 3 3 50 2812 3485 Chicago 3 2 2 1100 3369 2784 Houston 4 5 6 28 1234 1631 Philadelphia 5 4 4 29 1047 1949 1586 San Diego 6 8 14 697 1111 Detroit 7 6 5 206 1514 1028 Dallas 8 7 8 38 844 1007 Phoenix 9 9 20 584 983 Baltimore 10 10 7 14 434 905 736 Washington DC 11 15 9 189 757 607 Boston 12 20 16 18 448 641 574 Cleveland 13 18 10 261 751 506
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
(a) Diversity: US – largest urban area New York City CMSA (18m) is 300 times larger than the smallest MSA, Enid, Oklahoma (56000); (25m).
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 09/26/2009 for the course ECON 366 taught by Professor Sengupta during the Fall '08 term at USC.

Page1 / 6

Econ 366 - Chapter 4 - Chapter 4 Trends in Sizes and...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online