Econ 366 - Chapter 13

Econ 366 - Chapter 13 - PERSONAL TRANSPORT 1. 2. 3. 4. 5....

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PERSONAL TRANSPORT 1. personal urban travel: commuting (25%), shopping, recreation and socialization 2. Supply side – public sector: streets, highways / buses, subways , commuter trains – constructed, operated and maintained by government 3. Demand Side – private sector owns cars and trucks and pay street fees, motor vehicle fuel and tyre taxes, registration fees and transport fares 4. unlike public education (where people pay whether or not they send children to public schools) consumers can choose freely between private vehicles and public transit 5. government influence choices by constructing attractive public transit options(subways) or making automobile travel attractive (by building freeways) 6. Hence basic decisions are taken by the public sector and the consumers choose given the available options 7. government choice between mass transit and private automobiles: a. only large investment in mass transit can save central cities from congestion and pollution b. only private automobiles are likely so invest should be in good roads and expressways c. balanced system 1. government choices (including investments) must depend on size structure of urban areas and the available transport facilities.
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TRENDS IN URBAN TRANSPORTATION RAIL Subway Trolley Bus Total Auto (bil veh miles 1940 5943 2382 534 4239 13098 129.1 1950 3904 2264 1658 9420 17246 182.5 1960 463 1850 657 6425 9395 284.8 1970 235 1881 182 5034 7332 920.0 1980 133 2108 142 5836 8567 1122.0 1990 176 2346 126 5754 8873 1439.0 1. massive shift to private cars 1940-1990 – 11 times 2. if 1.5 passengers per trip (5 miles) on average, then 95% of commuter miles by car – dominance of automobiles 3. railroads and trolleys have nearly disappeared, subway travel declined somewhat (opening of subways in Atlanta, Baltimore, SF, Washington), bus travel increased after 1970
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Commuting pattern 1. Main concern work trips at morning and evening rush hours (peak load problem) 2. Due to rapid sub-urbanization of workplace and residences during postwar period – diversity in origin and destination of work trips Resi Resi Resi (blacks) Resi(blacks) Workplace C. City Suburbs C. city Suburbs CBD 15.4 6.1 - - Central City 55.7 20.8 99.0 49.7 Suburb 28.8 73.0 1.0 18.6 3. 21% from suburbs commute to central city while 29% in central city commute to suburbs 4. Overwhelming proportion of commuting is reverse or circumferential rather than towards CBD 5. High automobile ownership and urban expressways have contributed to
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This note was uploaded on 09/26/2009 for the course ECON 366 taught by Professor Sengupta during the Fall '08 term at USC.

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Econ 366 - Chapter 13 - PERSONAL TRANSPORT 1. 2. 3. 4. 5....

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