1.2 SEB323 Systems Concepts #2 20-Jul-09

1.2 SEB323 Systems Concepts #2 20-Jul-09 - Second lecture...

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Second lecture for this topic. We’ll have three lectures in this topic. The first assignment will be an online test covering this topic – the test will be open on DSO from Monday 27 July through to midnight Monday 3 August. 1
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A very simple systems model but we may still find it useful if we do not need to understand the internal structure and internal operations of the system itself. The focus of analysis using this simple model is on the throughputs and transformations by the system and its interactions with the environment. For example, I may be modelling the behaviour of a stepper motor in my robotic design and my focus is knowing what stimuli will affect it (say control voltage inputs) and what output is produced (rotation torque) I can treat the stepper motor as a “black box” system since I produced (rotation, torque). I can treat the stepper motor as a black box system since I do not need to understand its internal subsystems and the intricacies of its internal design. 2
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When analysing and modelling most organisations, simple models are typically insufficient. Organisations are normally open systems and there is typically a high level of interaction, and diversity of interaction, between organisations and their environment. A complex systems model is generally more appropriate – such as the one shown on the diagram. As a manager, you typically need to be aware of most/all of these interactions. Most importantly even if you decide that many of these factors in the environment do Most importantly, even if you decide that many of these factors in the environment do not directly impact your organisation, that does not mean you can ignore them. Consider the global financial crisis over the last 12 months. Did General Motors cause it? No. Could they have prevented it? No. In the USA alone, the demand for purchasing new vehicles dropped around 30% in late 2008. Why? The GFC’s impact on GM’s customers. Many people stopped buying new cars. The sudden drop in sales and sales revenues plunged GM into a financial crisis, reliance on US government handouts, and into bankruptcy. You manage a small specialist manufacturing company that produces the world’s best quality and best priced electronic engine management systems. Over 95% of your business in the last years has been supplying General Motors and most of your products are custom designed for their vehicles. Until 6 months ago, you had received no advice from GM that future orders may be reduced or cancelled. If you had been using a systems model as shown here to monitor and predict trends and events and their impacts to your business your company may be better positioned to survive to your business your company may be better positioned to survive.
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This note was uploaded on 09/27/2009 for the course SEB 323 - S taught by Professor Professor during the Three '09 term at Deakin.

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1.2 SEB323 Systems Concepts #2 20-Jul-09 - Second lecture...

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