Microsoft PowerPoint - Class 9 [SPANISH IN THE NORTHEAST+SPANISH GRAMMAR]jcw SP09

Microsoft PowerPoint - Class 9 [SPANISH IN THE NORTHEAST+SPANISH GRAMMAR]jcw SP09

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Spanish in the Northeast USA April 14, 2009 Language in the USA JC Weisenberg
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Spanish Speaking Countries See: http://www.ethnologue.com/show_language.asp?code=spa square6 America: Mexico, Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, Colombia, Venezuela, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Chile, Paraguay, Uruguay, Argentina. square6 Europe: Spain. square6 Asia: Israel (Ladino=Judeo Spanish), The Philippines (minority languages). square6 Africa: Equatorial Guinea. square6 US: Southwest US, California, Texas, Florida (Dade County), New York, Louisiana. square6 Rest of the world: Andorra, Belize, Gibraltar, Morocco, Trinidad & Tobago, Turkey (Ladino=Judeo Spanish), Western Sahara.
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square6 http://www.college.emory.edu/culpeper/BAKEWEL L/images/viceroyalty-ns.jpg Spanish speaking countries (in red)
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Spanish in the USA square6 The US is the 2nd largest Latin or Spanish speaking country in the world, after México. square6 In the U.S. Spanish was spoken before English in Florida, Louisiana, Texas, CA, Arizona, and New Mexico.
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History of Spanish in the SW square6 1513 - Spanish arrives in Florida with Ponce de León. square6 1650 - Spanish is dominant language from Florida and Louisiana across to the southwest United States. square6 1800 - Spain ceded the Louisiana territory to France. square6 1821 - Spain formally ceded Florida to the United States. square6 1600-1810 - Spain controlled all of what is now Mexico, Texas, Arizona, New Mexico, Nevada, California, western Colorado, and Utah. square6 1821 - Mexico achieved independence from Spain. square6 1836 - Texas declared independence from Mexico. square6 1848 - US fought a war with Mexico (1846-48) and gained control of New Mexico, Utah, Nevada, Arizona, California, and W. Colorado.
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Who are the Latinos in the Northeast US? (New England, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania) square6 5.2 million (15% of Latino population of US in 2000) square6 Diverse Group : Puerto Ricans, Dominicans, Cubans, Mexicans, Colombians, Mexicans, Ecuadorians, Argentines, Salvadorans, Guatemalans, Hondurans, Peruvians, Bolivians, Chileans, Venezuelans, Uruguayans, Nicaraguans, Costa Ricans, Panamanians, Spaniards.
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Who are the Latinos in New York? square6 New York City is 27% Latino square6 Culturally and numerically speaking, Puerto Ricans dominate other Latinos in New York City. Latinos in New York City 36% Puerto Rican 18% Dominican 10.9% South American 4.6% Central American
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Northeast Latino Immigration History square6 Brief Puerto Rican History: square4 P.R. a Spanish colony for 400 years square4 Became a US territory in 1898 (Won from Spain in the Spanish American War – had been granted autonomy from Spain shortly before US takeover) square4 1917: US citizenship granted to Puerto Ricans square4 1898-1948: “English Only” policy in schools enforced by US – largely unsuccessful (more dropouts than graduates) square4 1948-present: Spanish the language of instruction in P.R. - English & Spanish are official languages square4 1946: Mass emigration to NYC begins, with people seeking better economic opportunity (start of direct NY-San Juan flights encouraged this) square4 Commonwealth vs. State debate rages on, with a small but vocal minority seeking independence – language & cultural issues at the forefront
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