Class 9 [CREOLES IN THE USA & AROUND THE WORLD]jcw

Class 9[CREOLES IN - aroundtheworld LIN200 March24,2009 JCWeisenberg .Theylackawriting systemandrec

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Creole Languages in the USA and  around the world LIN 200 March 24, 2009 JC Weisenberg
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What’s a pidgin language? A pidgin structurally simple language that arises when people  who share no common language come into contact.  Pidgins are not generally written down. They lack a writing  system and receive no official recognition. In some cases a pidgin can become a “Lingua franca”  or  language of commerce in multilingual areas (Papua New  Guinea, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, etc.).
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Superstrate: English Substrate: Oceanic languages Mi  no luk I     not see “I didn’t look.” Mi no luk-im    pikipiki bulong iu not see-HIM?  pig belong you “I didn’t see  your pig.” Example: Solomon Islands Pidgin
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Solomon Islands Pidgin luk ‘look’ luk- im ‘see something sut ‘shoot’ sut- im ‘shoot at something’ Kwaio (Oceanic language) aga ‘look’ aga- si ‘see something’ fana ‘shoot’ fana- si ‘shoot something’ Example continued
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The Spread of Maritime Pidgins
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What are creole languages? Creoles are pidgins that have acquired native speakers. Creole languages emerge in a period of rapid social change among  people who do not share a common language; involves people from  at least 3 different language groups who come into extensive contact  (colonization, plantation slavery, conquest) whose ties to their native  language communities have been severed. Initially, a pidgin language emerges to facilitate communication.  Later, if social conditions are right, children begin to adopt the  pidgin as their native language.  Children appear to impose regularity onto the language, causing it to  be more grammatically complex than the pidgin language. Over  time, the language acquires an expanded lexicon, and becomes a  fully fledged language.
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The etymology of “creole” Latin:  creare  ‘to create’ Portuguese:  crioulo  (An African slave born in the New  World, term used in Brazil) from the verb  criar  (to raise, or  be brought up) Spanish cognate:  criollo  Creole  - culture or language of people born in the New  World Peninsulares  (born in Europe) Criollos - born in the New World Mestizos - people of mixed ancestry Indios, Africanos (negros) Iberian Colonial Social Hierarchy
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Sources of Linguistic Input for Creole  Sources of Linguistic Input for Creole  Development Development Superstrate : the socially dominant language. Most vocabulary from the superstrate language 
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This note was uploaded on 09/27/2009 for the course LIM 200 taught by Professor Weisenberg during the Spring '09 term at SUNY Stony Brook.

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Class 9[CREOLES IN - aroundtheworld LIN200 March24,2009 JCWeisenberg .Theylackawriting systemandrec

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