rtfgnk.docx - Notes 1 ^ Brothers Facundo Severo Duterte both married women from Danao Severo's daughter Beatriz married post-War business magnate Ramon

rtfgnk.docx - Notes 1 ^ Brothers Facundo Severo Duterte...

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Notes 1. ^ Brothers Facundo & Severo Duterte both married women from Danao; Severo's daughter Beatriz married post-War business magnate Ramon M. Durano, Sr. Their descendants constitute the modern-day political family of the Duranos of Danao, Cebu . Ramon M. Durano, Sr.'s sister Elisea married Paulo Almendras, and their descendants constitute the modern-day Almendrases of Cebu. One of their descendants, Jose Rene Almendras is a former Secretary of the Department of Foreign Affairs (acting) . [422] References 1. ^ Punzalan, Jamaine (May 3, 2016). "Duterte eyeing revolutionary gov't with Joma Sison: Trillanes" . News. ABS-CBN News . Manila . Retrieved July 2, 2016. 2. ^ Mendez, Christina (July 7, 2016). "Rody chooses Bahay Pangarap" . The Philippine Star . Retrieved July 7, 2016. 3. ^ Mendez, Christina (July 12, 2016). "Duterte moves into 'Bahay ng Pagbabago'" . The Philippine Star . Retrieved July 13, 2016. 4. ^ Andolong, Ina (July 27, 2016). "LOOK: President Duterte, Honeylet Avanceña give tour of Bahay Pagbabago" . CNN Philippines . Retrieved July 28, 2016. 5. ^ Flores, W.L. (June 19, 2016). "President-elect Rody Duterte as dad & memories of his own father" . The Philippine Star . Retrieved September 15, 2016. 6. ^ "Rodrigo Roa Duterte: 16th President, first Mindanawon to lead the country - MindaNews" . mindanews.com. Retrieved November 16, 2016. 7. ^ "Duterte seals presidency in Congress official tally" . Inquirer.net. May 27, 2016. Retrieved May 27, 2016. 8. ^ "Duterte, Robredo win in final, official tally" . Philippine Star. May 27, 2016. Retrieved May 27, 2016. 9. ^ "Official count: Duterte is new president, Robredo is vice president" . CNN Philippines. May 27, 2016. Retrieved May 27, 2016. 10. ^ "Sergio Osmeña | president of Philippines" . Encyclopædia Britannica . June 3, 2011. Archived from the original on April 6, 2017. Retrieved April 6, 2017. 11. ^ "Duterte to Police: 'Do Not Answer' Crimes Against Humanity Investigators" . Newsweek . March 2, 2018. 12. ^ "Philippines' Rodrigo Duterte under fire for calling God 'stupid'" . Financial Times . June 26, 2018. 13. ^ "Critics Slam Rodrigo Duterte for Asking a Woman to Kiss Him Onstage" . New York Times . June 4, 2018. 14. ^ Teehankee, Julio C. (2017). "Duterte's Resurgent Nationalism in the Philippines: A Discursive Institutionalist Analysis". Journal of Current Southeast Asian Affairs. 35 (3): 69– 89. doi : 10.1177/186810341603500304 . 15. ^ "Rodrigo Duterte Plays U.S. and China Off Each Other, in Echo of Cold War" . New York Times . November 3, 2016. 16. ^ "Behind Duterte's Break With the U.S., a Lifetime of Resentment" . Wall Street Journal . October 21, 2016. 17. ^ Jump up to: a b c "Philippine death squads very much in business as Duterte set for presidency" . Reuters. May 26, 2016. Retrieved September 14, 2016. Duterte's loud approval for hundreds of execution-style killings of drug users and criminals over nearly two decades helped propel him to the highest office of a crime-weary land.
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18. ^ "Philippine death squads very much in business as Duterte set for presidency" . Reuters. May 26, 2016. Retrieved September 14, 2016. Human rights groups have documented at least 1,400 killings in Davao that they allege had been carried out by death squads since 1998. Most of those murdered were drug users, petty criminals and street children.
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