Grade A_ The Market for a Yale Womanu2019s Eggs.pdf -...

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Grade A: The Market for a Yale Woman’s Eggs Jessica Cohen’s Grade A: The Market for a Yale Woman’s Eggs, which was published in The Atlantic Monthly in 2002, provides the basis of an argument over the ethicality of egg donation. In her writing, the author switches from telling a personal anecdote of her experience as being a potential egg donor to explaining egg donation and infertility as general subjects. Both of these processes are used in tandem to display the author’s main thesis, which is that “once a couple starts choosing a few characteristics, shooting for perfection is too easy especially if they can afford it.” Through a personal process of potential egg donation, and through telling facts about past incidents about embryo and egg scandals, the author informs the audience on why she didn’t end up becoming a donor after all. The beginning of the article describes the author stumbling upon an egg donation add, in which Cohen meets all of the extremely specific criteria except a good SAT score. She then describes the long process of egg harvestation, and how it is “neither simple nor painless.” After a short description of this, she jumps back into her personal process, and describes how it feels when she understands that people are judging her for materialistic qualities. Going back into the general fertility process, she describes the many ways people can solicit possible donors, or how donors can solicit possibile parents.

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