Bromination of Arenes - Bromination of Arenes: When we...

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Bromination of Arenes: When we think of functional groups, we don’t see them as functional, because we can’t do much with them. What you can do with them is a substitution reaction is substituting a hydrogen for a halogen. First is the homolytic cleavage is to create two halogen radicals. Next step is a halogen abstracting the hydrogen. Once you get past ethane, you get to molecules with different hydrogens, so is there some selectability between the hydrogens. This is important because if you want a reaction with a specific substitute, you need to know if the hydrogen is reactive or do you get a mixture of compounds that will have to be separated later. If you, for example, chlorinate it, you get a specific selectivity of molecules .If it’s just random, then there’s a 3:1 product ratio, but when you actually do it, you see a 45%/55% for 2-chloropropane. What do we learn? 2-Chloropropane is a preferred product, there is selectivity involved in it. This, however, doesn’t help us much since we still have to separate the stuff out, so there should be a better way to do this. Instead of chlorine, use bromine! The same idea is possible but the product distribution is 97% 2-bromopropane and 3% 1-bromopropane. Looking at this data, bromine is much more selective to second carbons in propane. What this means is that we can
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Bromination of Arenes - Bromination of Arenes: When we...

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