Tech_Ethernet_v1r0c0 - Technical Tutorial Introduction to Ethernet Introduction to Ethernet Technical Tutorial 2002 12 06 Technical Tutorial

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Introduction to Ethernet Technical Tutorial 2002 – 12 - 06 Technical Tutorial Introduction to Ethernet
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2 Table of Contents 1: Introduction 2: Ethernet 3: IEEE standards 4: Topology 5: CSMA/CD 6: Wireless-LAN 7: Transmission Speed 8: Limitations of Ethernet 9: Sena Products and Ethernet Technical Tutorial Introduction to Ethernet
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3 1. Introduction In today's business world, reliable and efficient access to information has become an important asset in the quest to achieve a competitive advantage. File cabinets and mountains of papers have given way to computers that store and manage information electronically. Computer networking technologies are the glue that binds these elements together. Networking allows one computer to send information to and receive information from another. We can classify network technologies as belonging to one of two basic groups. Local area network (LAN) technologies connect many devices that are relatively close to each other, usually in the same building. The library terminals that display book information would connect over a local area network. Wide area network (WAN) technologies connect a smaller number of devices that can be many kilometers apart. In comparison to WANs, LANs are faster and more reliable, but improvements in technology continue to blur the line of demarcation. Fiber optic cables have allowed LAN technologies to connect devices tens of kilometers apart, while at the same time greatly improving the speed and reliability of WANs. Technical Tutorial Introduction to Ethernet
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4 2. Ethernet Ethernet has been a relatively inexpensive, reasonably fast, and very popular LAN technology for several decades. Two individuals at Xerox PARC -- Bob Metcalfe and D.R. Boggs -- developed Ethernet beginning in 1972 and specifications based on this work appeared in IEEE 802.3 in 1980. Ethernet has since become the most popular and most widely deployed network technology in the world. Many of the issues involved with Ethernet are common to many network technologies, and understanding how Ethernet addressed these issues can provide a foundation that will improve your understanding of networking in general. The Ethernet standard has grown to encompass new technologies as computer networking has matured. Specified in a standard, IEEE 802.3, an Ethernet LAN typically uses coaxial cable or special grades of twisted pair wires. Ethernet is also used in wireless LANs. Ethernet uses the CSMA/CD access method to handle simultaneous demands. The most commonly installed Ethernet systems are called 10BASE-T and provide transmission speeds up to 10 Mbps. Devices are connected to the cable and compete for access using a Carrier Sense Multiple Access with Collision Detection (CSMA/CD) protocol. Fast Ethernet or 100BASE-T provides transmission speeds up to 100 megabits per second and is typically used for LAN backbone systems, supporting workstations with 10BASE-T cards. Gigabit Ethernet provides an
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This note was uploaded on 09/28/2009 for the course X RAY MECH EMP5209 taught by Professor Hui-leo-chen during the Fall '09 term at University of Ottawa.

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Tech_Ethernet_v1r0c0 - Technical Tutorial Introduction to Ethernet Introduction to Ethernet Technical Tutorial 2002 12 06 Technical Tutorial

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