Response to Antigone

Response to Antigone - Jessica Granger CLAS 320gm Section...

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Jessica Granger CLAS 320gm Section 19833 4/23/09 Response Paper Antigone Community, leading by example and societal exclusion play key parts in “Antigone,” and reveal much about the main characters, Creon and Antigone. Creon, King of Thebes, concerns himself with society and maintaining order. Upon the death of Antigone’s two brothers, Eteocles and Polynices, Creon becomes king, a task that seems like somewhat of a personal burden. The practicality with which he rules his kingdom forces him to sentence his niece Antigone to death, despite his attempt at covering up her crime. He sees his actions as being useful and necessary to the upholding of his kingdom. “I will take her down some wild, desolate path… to keep the entire city free of defilement” (870-874). Creon is restricted not by his emotions, but by his power. This is where he and Antigone most differ. Antigone, rebellious and senseless, has completely given herself up emotionally for her cause. She fully admits to her crime when
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This note was uploaded on 09/28/2009 for the course CLAS 320GM taught by Professor Richter during the Spring '08 term at USC.

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Response to Antigone - Jessica Granger CLAS 320gm Section...

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