Journal04 - for each land area, the daily curve number,...

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Timothy Lin BEE 1510: Introduction to Computer Programming Course Journal Entry: HW04 due: 11/20/08 The important thing I learned from this homework exercise was how to read data from various files, import them into arrays that I could use, and then to use those arrays to calculate a large group of data that then could be sorted out and interpreted. For this task, three data files were given for precipitation over a year, temperatures over a year and water shed data for over a year. Those three files had to be read by the script file created and logical arrays created brand new data arrays. Next, two logical arrays were created to describe the state of the soil, frozen or not, and the vegetation canopy, dormant or not. Next, antecedent moisture was calculated from the antecedent moisture function with inputs of rain and snow melt.
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Unformatted text preview: for each land area, the daily curve number, maximum soil water retention, daily runoff values and total runoff volume was calculated. Then the runoff values were summed up and plotted and finally the values were written to a text file and the nonzero values were written to the Command Window. I learned a lot about what it takes to calculate the something as simple as the amount of water collected over an area over one full year. There was a lot of different parts that needed to be put into this program. There was not a lot to learn in terms of background but a lot of what had to be learned was the nuances of the programming. The basic concepts were easy enough to learn, but combining everything, such as reading data files, for loops, if/else loops was the main challenge....
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This note was uploaded on 09/28/2009 for the course BEE 1510 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '05 term at Cornell University (Engineering School).

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