POSCLectureNotes*

POSCLectureNotes* - Final POSC Notes 11/12/2007 00:22:00...

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Final POSC Notes 11/12/2007 00:22:00 How to start the paper: First step is looking for a potential case for analysis Identify a policy area that interests me—the war on terror, abortion,  intellectual property, etc.  (Intellectual property involves entertainment shit,  might be good for me) Go to CQ Weekly database and do a key word search with topic and “court” Read about the case If it seems interesting, go to lexis/nexis and obtain a copy of the case and  briefs (if available) In general, recent SC cases are best Tort Law –  is a branch of civil law, which deals with  wrongful acts  involving  injuries to person, property or reputation. (Note: it excludes damages resulting from a  breach of contract) Insuranc e is a private contract or public regulatory system, which spreads the  risk of individual loss.  Recap: The “Over Time” Puzzle 19 th Century – an “economic development” regime* 20 th century – a “compensation” regime**
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*A set of rules that provided narrow Causes of action and broad defense,  Making it very difficult to obtain compensation  For injures **A set of rules that provides broader cause of action and fewer defenses,  making it easier to obtain compensation Why the Change?     Spread of insurance   (which eliminates risk of bankrupting key businesses) Rise in public expectation for compensation  (both because or rise in  insurance and liberalization of tort law) Technological advances   (especially in industrial design) Increase in social distance   (and hence greater reliance on courts)
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Collectively, rise in  “total justice” —the expectation that modern industrial  societies can and should compensate its citizens for unexpected losses and  harms (versus just “lumping it”) Aside #1…     If we live in an age of “total justice” how do you explain the rise of tort  reform measures designed to limit recourse to the courts? One answer is that many tort reforms only work on the margins In addition, tort is only a small part of a broader compensation regime  that features public and private insurance A third is that, consistent with Kagan, demands for total justice did not  displace traditional individualist political culture. Tort reform could be  seen as part of a backlash against total justice.  Aside #2: Should the courts have rewritten the law?     Yes… Workers faced powerful, well-organized companies, which had  “captured” the political process
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This note was uploaded on 09/29/2009 for the course POSC 190 taught by Professor Rosen during the Fall '08 term at USC.

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POSCLectureNotes* - Final POSC Notes 11/12/2007 00:22:00...

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