NATS 102 ch 9

NATS 102 ch 9 - Chapter 9 Remnants of Rock and Ice...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–18. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 9 Remnants of Rock and Ice Asteroids, Comets, and Pluto
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
9.1 Asteroids and Meteorites Our Goals for Learning • Why is there an asteroid belt? • How are meteorites related to asteroids?
Background image of page 2
Asteroid Facts Asteroids are rocky leftovers of planet formation. Largest is Ceres, diameter ~1,000 km 150,000 in catalogs, and probably over a million with diameter >1 km. Small asteroids are more common than large asteroids. All the asteroids in the solar system wouldn’t add up to even a small terrestrial planet.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Asteroids are cratered and not round
Background image of page 4
Why is there an asteroid belt?
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
More than 150,000 asteroids at their predicted locations for Jan 1 2004 On this scale, asteroids are much smaller than the dots used to represent them
Background image of page 6
Why are there very few asteroids beyond Jupiter’s orbit? A. There was no rocky material beyond Jupiter’s orbit. B. The heaviest rocks sank towards the center of the solar system. C. Ice could form in the outer solar system. D. A passing star probably stripped away all of those asteroids, even if they were there at one time.
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Why are there very few asteroids beyond Jupiter’s orbit? A. There was no rocky material beyond Jupiter’s orbit. B. The heaviest rocks sank towards the center of the solar system. C. Ice could form in the outer solar system. D. A passing star probably stripped away all of those asteroids, even if they were there at one time.
Background image of page 8
Which explanation seems to be the most plausible? A. The belt is where all the asteroids happened to form. B. The belt is the remnant of a large terrestrial planet that used to be between Mars and Jupiter. C. The belt is where all the asteroids happened to survive.
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Which explanation seems to be the most plausible? A. The belt is where all the asteroids happened to form. B. The belt is the remnant of a large terrestrial planet that used to be between Mars and Jupiter. C. The belt is where all the asteroids happened to survive. But WHY didn’t they form a little planet?
Background image of page 10
Gravitational interactions (orbital resonances ) with Jupiter have ejected asteroids on certain orbits.
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Rocky planetesimals survived in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter because they did not accrete into a planet. Jupiter’s gravity, through the influence of orbital resonances, stirred up asteroid orbits and thereby prevented their accretion into a planet.
Background image of page 12
How are meteorites related to asteroids?
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
How are meteorites related to asteroids? Meteorites are pieces of asteroids - or sometimes planets or the Moon.
Background image of page 14
Meteor: The bright tail of hot debris from the rock Meteorite: A rock from space that reaches Earth’s surface
Background image of page 15

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Peekskill, NY: October 9, 1992
Background image of page 16
1) Primitive: Unchanged in composition since they first formed 4.6 billion years ago. 1) Processed: Younger, have experienced
Background image of page 17

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 18
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/02/2008 for the course NATS 102 taught by Professor Coyne during the Spring '08 term at Arizona.

Page1 / 79

NATS 102 ch 9 - Chapter 9 Remnants of Rock and Ice...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 18. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online