ASTR 101 Lectures 5 and 6

ASTR 101 Lectures 5 and 6 - The Birth of Modern Science...

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The Birth of Modern Science Following Copernicus: Tycho Brahe 1546-1601 Johannes Kepler 1571-1630 Galileo Galilei 1564-1642 "There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy." William Shakespeare 1564-1616
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Nova of 1572 showed heavens were not immutable ( Siderius Nuncius introduction discusses comet of 1577 as well) Built an Observatory on Hven, which he used to measure planetary positions to better accuracy than ever before (1 arcminute = 60 arcseconds) Parallaxes were not measurable with his equipment, so he rejected Copernicus and made a hybrid model Measured positions very accurately (60 arcseconds, but 1 arcsecond is needed to detect largest parallax) Tycho Brahe
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Tycho Brahe In going back to school in Wittenberg, It is most retrograde to our desire. Why should we in our peevish opposition Take it to heart? She is so conjunctive to my life and soul, That as the star moves not but in his sphere, I could not but by her.
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Tycho Brahe [24.01] A New Reading of Shakespeare's Hamlet. P. D. Usher (PSU) I argue that Hamlet is an allegory for the competition between the cosmological models of the contemporaries Thomas Digges (1546-1595) of England and Tycho Brahe (1546-1601) of Denmark.
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Johannes Kepler Around 1590, while lecturing, Kepler had an insight relating planetary orbits to geometric solids. This is an accident, but a fortunate one, for it caused Kepler to pursue Heliocentric models. Mysterium Cosmographicum (1594) told of this insight and introduced the concept of a "force" emitted by the sun which propels the planets. He did not get along with Brahe, but he did eventually
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This note was uploaded on 09/29/2009 for the course ASTR 101 taught by Professor Christiansen during the Spring '08 term at UNC.

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ASTR 101 Lectures 5 and 6 - The Birth of Modern Science...

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