ASTR 101 Lectures 9 and 10

ASTR 101 Lectures 9 and 10 - water form, along with the...

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Telescopes Astronomical objects are so far away, the light rays we measure are essentially parallel. A telescope brings these rays to a focus at a flat surface, where a camera or other detector can be placed. Larger telescopes collect more light, resulting in a brighter image
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The Planets
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Solar System Properties 1. Terrestrial (rocky) and Jovian (gaseous) planets separated into inner and outer solar system 2. Orbits lie in plane, orbit in same direction 3. Most of the angular momentum is in Jupiter, almost none in the sun. 4. Most of the mass in the sun Angular momentum: The product of mass, velocity and distance (from center of rotation) for a circularly rotating object.
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Solar Nebula
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Solar System Formation
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Condensation Sequence Temperature in the Solar Nebula In the inner solar nebula, where temperatures are hot, only heavy things like metals and silicates can condense into solids or liquids, while the remaining gasses are swept away by radiation pressure. In the outer solar nebula, condensates of lighter materials, like
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Unformatted text preview: water form, along with the heavier materials, but the gasses are not dispersed, so the composition of large gas planets is more like the sun. The existence of water on Earth (and Mars), and the newly discovered exoplanets are a challenge for this model. Other Solar Systems At first, methods are only sensitive to Large Mass planets in short period orbits, which we dont have in our solar system. www.exoplanets.org Modifications to the Model 1. The water on inner planets could be returned by the impact of many comets, balls of ice that formed further out and were gravitationally disturbed into colliding orbits by the giant planets. The gas giants in close orbits found elsewhere could have formed far out and migrated inward. 1. The angular momentum of the proto-sun could have been redistributed by a magnetic field into the disk that formed planets, explaining their relatively high angular momenta....
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This note was uploaded on 09/29/2009 for the course ASTR 101 taught by Professor Christiansen during the Spring '08 term at UNC.

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ASTR 101 Lectures 9 and 10 - water form, along with the...

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