Lecture 7 Material Balances

Lecture 7 Material Balances - 3) Extent of reaction The...

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Material Balances Lecture # 7
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Multiple reactions, yield, and selectivity In addition to producing a desired product, often one or more undesirable products may also be produced through side reactions.
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Multiple reactions, yield, and selectivity The terms yield and selectivity are used to describe the degree to which a desired reaction predominates over competing side reactions:
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Multiple reactions, yield, and selectivity The concept of extent of reaction is applied to multiple reactions. Each reaction has its own extent of reaction.
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Multiple reactions, yield, and selectivity Example:
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Multiple reactions, yield, and selectivity
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Example 4.6-3, page 124
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Chemical Equilibrium Example 4.6-2, page 122
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Balances on reactive processes For these processes, we may utilize any of three different approaches. 1) Molecular balances (includes generation or consumption of species). 2) Atomic balances (only input = output)
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Unformatted text preview: 3) Extent of reaction The definition of degrees of freedom depends on the method chosen. It is important to apply balances only to independent molecular or atomic species and independent reactions. Independent equations, species, and reactions If two molecular species or atomic species occur in the same ratio wherever they appear in a process, balances on those species will not be independent equations, i.e. they can be derived from each other. In this case we have only one independent species. Chemical reactions are independent only if the stoichiometric equation of any one of them cannot be obtained by adding and subtracting multiples of the stoichiometric equations of the others. For example: A 2B (1) B C (2) A 2C (3) These three reactions are not all independent since (3) = (1) + 2 (2) Class exercise:...
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This note was uploaded on 09/29/2009 for the course CHEE 1234 taught by Professor Retge during the Spring '09 term at University of Greenwich.

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Lecture 7 Material Balances - 3) Extent of reaction The...

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