Lecture 14 - Lecture 14: Properties of Inorganic Materials...

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Lecture 14: Properties of Inorganic Materials Demonstration: organic and inorganic semiconductors and metals Metals Almost always crystalline (exception: bulk metallic glasses studied by Professor Hufnagel). Good examples of the simple crystal packing arrangements Properties dominated by the “sea of electrons” created by the metallic bonding Electrical conductivity is one of the most important of the properties The conductivity can be as high as 10 -6 ohm cm (gold, copper). That means an ohm meter probing opposite faces of a 1 cm 3 sample would register one millionth of an ohm Conductivity in certain special cases is essentially infinity—superconductivity. The mechanism for this is complicated and controversial. This generally requires temperatures near absolute zero Conductivity is typically limited by interactions between the moving electrons and phonons (vibrations) in the solid that scatter the electrons off their path. When temperature goes up, conductivity goes DOWN because of this increased coupling to the phonons Semiconductors Bonding is covalent network (exception: molecular solids with strong pi overlaps)
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Lecture 14 - Lecture 14: Properties of Inorganic Materials...

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