Discussion 2 - In the story of The Key Ikuko cannot be distinctly described neither as the culprit nor the victim in the transformation of her

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In the story of The Key , Ikuko cannot be distinctly described neither as the culprit nor the victim in the transformation of her relationship with her husband. In many ways, her strong sense of personal morality and her actions throughout the novel work both in and against her favor. She can be categorized as a victim in the way her husband uses her wifely obligations to omit to him and let him do to her what he pleases. He sees how she reacts to alcohol, and uses it as a tool against her, urging her to drink more and more until she is at a point of utter complacency. Even when she knows exactly what’s going on, and her husband’s intentions, she continues to let him because of her “duty” as a wife. Her husband continues to exploit her, including the relationship between her and Kimura, giving them excuses to be together, and then tempting them with the other to satisfy his own sexual needs. Lastly, Ikuko’s husband knows exactly how she feels about things such as exposing herself, invading others’ privacy, and her responsibilities to be an unwaveringly dutiful wife, and uses them to test her and provoke her without actively caring
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This document was uploaded on 09/30/2009.

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Discussion 2 - In the story of The Key Ikuko cannot be distinctly described neither as the culprit nor the victim in the transformation of her

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