discussion 5 - A . Aunt Emilys diary is full of vivid...

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A. Aunt Emily’s diary is full of vivid descriptions of the treatment of Japanese-Canadian citizens and the ways in which it impacted her family during World War II. The containment of the Japanese race in both the United States and Canada is a very overlooked part of history, but its impact and the traumatic personal accounts are still deeply saddening. The entries quickly develop a sense of immediacy from one to the next. The first entry is quite mild, where she talks about her decision to write the diary, the children, and the optimism of the war going on around them “The RCMP are on our side. More than anyone else, they know how blameless we are” (Kogawa97). However, as the entries continue, worse and worse things begin to take hold of her life. The entries now explain the new restrictive measurements on the Japanese citizens. “If we’re caught out after sundown, we’re thrown in jail” (Kogawa102). It talks about the discrimination they face, “Signs have been posted on all highways- “Japs Keep Out” (Kogawa 103). However, the worse comes from her frightening honesty, when at the end of
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This document was uploaded on 09/30/2009.

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discussion 5 - A . Aunt Emilys diary is full of vivid...

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