Black Death paper 1

Black Death paper 1 - Shin David Shin Mrs. Evanochko WRT...

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Shin David Shin Mrs. Evanochko WRT 105 29 September 2009 Reactions to Terror: The Bubonic Plague and its Consequences Fear, “a feeling of agitation and dread caused by the presence of danger”, ultimately limits the human mind from acting rationally (http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/fear). Directly linked to the outbreak of a pandemic disease, fear, as a consequence, engenders human naiveté. The effects of the bubonic plague or rather, the Black Death, demonstrates a people as a whole who chose to neglect human intelligence; hence, terror bred irrational behavior. Fear, the crucial component of mass chaos, essentially enveloped the European continent. Thus, as the bubonic plague unexpectedly engulfed and decimated a quarter of the European population, the widespread fear and insecurity that struck millions of people inevitably resulted in different behavioral patterns concerning religious clemency, physical survival, and outright indifference. Throughout the plague, the behavioral tendency to fabricate supernatural answers overtly illustrated the powerful presence of fear. Initially in 1665, as the bubonic plague began to spread throughout Europe, London and her citizens were skeptical and yet, dumbfounded by the presence of such a disease (Defoe 9). Soon enough, the virulent infection could no longer be suppressed by the sheer number of deaths every week (Defoe 17). Ominous religious warnings ultimately played a major role with the dissemination of constant and immediate fear (Defoe 21). For instance, in The Plague in Continental Europe , Gabriele de’ Mussis proclaims God’s judgment: “'I shall wipe man, whom I created, off the face of the earth. Because he is flesh and blood, let him he turned to dust and ashes. My spirit shall not remain among man'” (Horrox 18). Simply put, Mussis’s interpretation of the religious perspective stems from the, “entire human race wallowing in the mire of manifold wickedness” (Horrox 18). Fearful of the Almighty’s message, people illogically deduced that to shout, “I have been a Thief, I have been an Adulterer,
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Shin I have been a Murderer” would satisfy and please God for their short and speedy confessions (Defoe 33). Even countless “creatures who ignorant and stupid in their Reflections, as they were
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This note was uploaded on 09/30/2009 for the course WRT 94010 taught by Professor Evanochko during the Fall '09 term at Rochester.

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Black Death paper 1 - Shin David Shin Mrs. Evanochko WRT...

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