Plato - Section from Platos Republic book 2 In this section...

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Section from Plato’s Republic – book 2 In this section of Plato’s Republic , Glaucon speaks with Socrates about the nature of justice. Glaucon says that men only practice justice out of necessity and given the opportunity, would act unjustly if they could get away with it. “No man can be imagined to be of such an iron nature that he would stand fast in justice. No man would keep his hands off what was not his own when he could safely take what he liked…” To further illustrate his point he sets up the following scenario. There are two individuals; one is unjust and the other is just. The unjust man is seen as just by the world and so he reaps all the benefits of a just person while also gaining the benefits of the crooked, as he is not bound by any sense of morality. As a result, he is rich, well loved, and lives a full and pleasant life. The just person on the other hand is viewed by the world as unjust and so, his life is filled with (undeserved) punishment, torture, and suffering. Who, Glaucon asks, is the happier
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This note was uploaded on 10/01/2009 for the course PHIL 262g at USC.

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Plato - Section from Platos Republic book 2 In this section...

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