Lecture fifteen 11 03 08

Lecture fifteen 11 03 08 - 10,000 plant pathogenic fungi...

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10,000 plant pathogenic fungi
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Agriculture selects for aggressive pathogens OK to kill the host Because it will be back next year Monoculture
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Native ecosystems Disease is rare And rarely severe
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Unless there is a disturbance Resulting in habitat alterations Create opportunities Natural or human caused Explores interesting parallels between biology and economics
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Deposition of spores Wood rotting fungus Grow into stump
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Grow into tree roots Wood-rotting fungi grow into the stump
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Wood rotting fungus Moves through root grafts
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Into adjacent healthy trees Wood rotting fungus Moves through root grafts
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Kills roots on living trees
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Disease center
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1 Km Expanding disease center Fungi exploit opportunities created by disturbances
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No disturbance Decompose wood on dead or injured trees
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Disturbances that lead to disease problems Altered host distribution Timber harvests Plantations
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Rubber tree Hevea brasiliensis
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Rubber tree Hevea brasiliensis Rubber tree Hevea brasiliensis
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Brazilian rain forest one tree per acre
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Rubber collection required many people To search for trees
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Auto industry increased demand for rubber Henry Ford Ford wanted a reliable supply of cheap rubber
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Henry Ford bought land in Brazil in 1929 To produce rubber ~4000 square miles
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Plantations of rubber trees Were grown at high density Rubber production was limited
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Lecture fifteen 11 03 08 - 10,000 plant pathogenic fungi...

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