Lecture 14 - International Affairs Lecture 14 IPE, Realism...

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International Affairs Lecture 14 IPE, Realism and Liberalism: The Sequel Michael Colaresi International AffairsLecture 14IPE, Realism and Liberalism: The Sequel – p.1/19
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Geo-economics Mercantilist policies with a liberal twist. Economic conflict, state vs. state, using trade, currency and debt. During Cold War and before, we were in an age of geopolitics , where conflict could break out into politico-military conflict. Now, geo-economic proponents suggest that military conflict is less likely (high costs to war). We are going to see a rise in economic conflict (still can hurt others) International AffairsLecture 14IPE, Realism and Liberalism: The Sequel – p.2/19
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Geo-economics II Why will there be economic conflict? States still can not get along (even less so now that EU and US are not facing the same Communist-bloc threats). But it makes less sense to fight (nuclear obliteration). Therefore we will see the “weapons of commerce” EXAMPLE: Boeing versus Airbus (US vs. EU) sanctions (resolved for now, but for how long?) International AffairsLecture 14IPE, Realism and Liberalism: The Sequel – p.3/19
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Geo-economics III The continuation of political conflict by economic means. Like realism and mercantilism: States are in perpetual competition. Like liberals: warfare has become more costly, and economics have become more important. Definitely more realist/mercantilist than liberal. International AffairsLecture 14IPE, Realism and Liberalism: The Sequel – p.4/19
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Zooming In One way to look at whether the realist/mercantilist assumption that the state is a unitary actor is to analyze the politico-economic interactions within states. How do states decide to build weapons? Just based on international threats? Many people suggest that this is not the case. International AffairsLecture 14IPE, Realism and Liberalism: The Sequel – p.5/19
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Iron Triangle Eisenhower and others have warned that that a powerful military-industial complex actually drives arms production in the US. How does this work?
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Lecture 14 - International Affairs Lecture 14 IPE, Realism...

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