Springs in Series

Springs in Series - Springs in Series In this problem you...

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Springs in Series In this problem you will study two cases of springs connected in series that will enable you to draw a general conclusion. Two springs in series Consider two massless springs connected in series. Spring 1 has a spring constant , and spring 2 has a spring constant . A constant force of magnitude is being applied to the right. When the two springs are connected in this way, they form a system equivalent to a single spring of spring constant . A. What is the effective spring constant of the two-spring system? Express the effective spring constant in terms of and . = (1/k_1+1/k_2)^(-1) Three springs in series Now consider three springs set up in series as shown.
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The spring constants are , , and , and the force acting to the right again has magnitude . A. Find the spring constant of the three-spring system. Express your answer in terms of , , and . = (1/k_1+1/k_2+1/k_3)^(-1) [ Print ] Position, Velocity, and Acceleration of an Oscillator Learning Goal: To learn to find kinematic variables from a graph of position vs. time. The graph of the position of an oscillating object as a function of time is shown.
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Some of the questions ask you to determine ranges on the graph over which a statement is true. When answering these questions, choose the most complete answer. For example, if the answer "B to D" were correct, then "B to C" would technically also be correct--but you will only recieve credit for choosing the most complete answer. A. Where on the graph is ? A to B A to C C to D C to E B to D A to B and D to E B. Where on the graph is ? A to B A to C C to D C to E B to D A to B and D to E C. Where on the graph is ? A only C only E only A and C A and C and E B and D D. Where on the graph is the velocity ? A to B A to C C to D C to E B to D A to B and D to E E. Where on the graph is the velocity ? A to B A to C C to D C to E B to D A to B and D to E F. Where on the graph is the velocity ? A only B only C only D only E only A and C A and C and E B and D
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G. Where on the graph is the acceleration ? A to B A to C C to D C to E B to D A to B and D to E H. Where on the graph is the acceleration ? A to B A to C C to D C to E B to D A to B and D to E I. Where on the graph is the acceleration ? A only B only C only D only E only A and C A and C and E B and D [ Print ] Mass Hitting a Spring A block sliding with velocity along a frictionless floor hits a spring at time (configuration 1). The spring compresses until the block comes to a momentary stop (configuration 2). Finally, the spring expands, pushing the block back in the direction from which it came. In this problem you will be shown a series of plots related to the motion of the block and spring, and you will be asked to identify what the plots represent. In each plot, the point labeled "1" refers to configuration 1 (when the block first comes in contact with the spring). The point labeled "2" refers to configuration 2 (when the block comes to rest with the spring compressed).
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Springs in Series - Springs in Series In this problem you...

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