section 1_11

Section 1_11 - Math 1650 Lecture Notes Jason Snyder PhD §1.11 Modeling Variation 1.11 Modeling Variation Direct Variation Direct Variation If

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Math 1650 Lecture Notes §1.11 Jason Snyder, PhD. Modeling Variation Page 1 of 3 § 1.11: Modeling Variation Direct Variation Example 1 Direct Variation During a thunderstorm you see the lightning before you hear the thunder because light travels faster than sound. The distance between you and the storm varies directly as the time interval between the lightning and the thunder. (a) Suppose that the thunder from a storm 5400 ft away takes 5 s to reach you. Determine the constant of proportionality and write the equation for the variation. (b) Sketch the graph of this equation. What does the constant of proportionality represent? (c) If the time interval between the lightning and thunder is now 8 s, how far away is the storm? ? = °? Direct Variation If the quantities x and y are related by an equation for some constant k 0 , we say that y varies directly as x , or y is directly proportional to x , or simply y is proportional to x . The constant k is called the constant of proportionality .
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This note was uploaded on 10/07/2009 for the course MATH 150 taught by Professor Unknown during the Spring '06 term at Ohio State.

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Section 1_11 - Math 1650 Lecture Notes Jason Snyder PhD §1.11 Modeling Variation 1.11 Modeling Variation Direct Variation Direct Variation If

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