Section 3_1 - Math 1650 Lecture Notes 3.1 Jason Snyder, PhD...

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Unformatted text preview: Math 1650 Lecture Notes 3.1 Jason Snyder, PhD Polynomial Functions and Their Graphs Page 1 of 10 3.1: Polynomial Functions and Their Graphs Graphs of Polynomials The graphs of polynomials of degree 0 or 1 are lines and the graphs of polynomials of degree 2 are parabolas. As the degree of the polynomial increases, the graphs become more complex. The graphs of several polynomial functions are shown below: x y ? = ? x y ? = ? 2 ? = ? + 1 ? 1 + + 1 ? + Polynomial Functions A polynomial function of degree n is a function of the form where is a non-negative integer and 0. The numbers , 1 , , 1 , are called the coefficients of the polynomial. The number is called the constant coefficient or constant term . The number , the coefficient of the highest power, is the leading coefficient , and ? is called the leading term . Math 1650 Lecture Notes 3.1 Jason Snyder, PhD Polynomial Functions and Their Graphs Page 2 of 10 x y ? = ? 3 x y ? = ? 4 x y ? = ? 5 Math 1650 Lecture Notes 3.1 Jason Snyder, PhD Polynomial Functions and Their Graphs Page 3 of 10 Example 1 Transformations of Monomials Sketch the graphs of the following functions (a) ? = ?...
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Section 3_1 - Math 1650 Lecture Notes 3.1 Jason Snyder, PhD...

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