week1 - Introduction to ENSC 101 1 of 27 Introduction to...

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Unformatted text preview: Introduction to ENSC 101 1 of 27 Introduction to ENSC 101 Steve Whitmore September 2008 Introduction to ENSC 101 2 of 27 Learning Objectives At the end of this module, you will understand how ENSC 101 is organized and graded. In addition, you will have learned some basics about the ENSC communication program, including the following: The components of the communication program The importance of communication skills Professionalism and student conduct Where to get help Introduction to ENSC 101 3 of 27 A Welcome from Steve Welcome to SFU, The School of Engineering Science, and ENSC 101. My name is Steve Whitmore . I answer to Steve . But you can call me Mr. Whitmore, Professor Whitmore, or Sir. You can call me other things, but its probably better if you dont do so to my face. Unless you really want to discover what cynics eat for lunch. Introduction to ENSC 101 4 of 27 How to Contact Me My office is ASB 9870 in the 9000 level lab (card access required). I am usually in on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays. My e-mail address is whitmore@sfu.ca (contact me via e-mail to set up an appointment to see me). My phone numbers are 778-782-4946 (W) and 604-291- 2717 (H) . The home number is only to be used in an emergency (i.e., a personal crisis). TA e-mails will be provided in the tutorials and are listed on the course website (WebCT). Introduction to ENSC 101 5 of 27 ENSC 101 We meet from 09:30-11:20 every Tuesday this fall. You also attend a tutorial group once a week ( attendance to the tutorials is mandatory ). No tutorials this week. As required, you may be asked to meet with me or one of the course TAs ( attendance is mandatory ). If not registered in ENSC 100, please see me after class. ENSC 101 and ENSC 100 (Professor John Jones) are closely integrated, and the TAs, tutorials, and assignments overlap. ENSC 101 is a blended course, so you must have regular access to WebCT ( http://webct.sfu.ca ). You are expected to check your SFU e-mail account and the WebCT discussion groups 3 times per week. Introduction to ENSC 101 6 of 27 Critical Thinking A key theme for both 100 and 101 is critical thinking. The asking of questions is fundamental to critical thinking. Education is less about answers than about questions. The ability to ask questions drives curiosity, leads to new knowledge and understanding, and fosters life-long learning. Question what you are told; ask questions if you dont understand. In this class, there are no wrong questions (but occasionally there are wrong answers). Introduction to ENSC 101 7 of 27 Topics Covered in ENSC 101 The rhetorical context (audience, purpose, and tone) The writing process (planning, drafting, and revising) Research strategies and referencing conventions Writing persuasively and supporting a position Oral presentations and poster presentations Organizational strategies Academic integrity Critical thinking Introduction to ENSC 101...
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week1 - Introduction to ENSC 101 1 of 27 Introduction to...

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