16805890 - Donna Y. Ford James L. Moore III Deborah A....

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Unformatted text preview: Donna Y. Ford James L. Moore III Deborah A. Harmon Integrating Multicultural and Gifted Education: A Curricular Framework This article raises a number of critical questions related to multiculturalism and gifted education. In particular, the authors suggest that culturally relevant content is lacking in gifted education pro- grams. They make the case that gifted students of color are being shortchanged by gifted education programs that lack infusion of diversity issues; these students would benefit substantially from gifted education programs that infuse multicultur- alism throughout the curricula. Last, but not least, the article introduces and discusses the Ford and Harris (1999) model for infusing multiculturalism in gifted education programs. A S STATED THROUGHOUT this special theme is- sue, gifted education faces critical challenges as the nation becomes increasingly diverse. With the increasing diversity, there comes the need to change many school practices, not only in terms of increasing the representation of students of color in gifted education but also in terms of more effec- tively meeting the academic needs of students who are gifted and diverse. In other words, once gifted students of color are recruited (i.e., identified and placed), public schools are challenged to address the following questions: (a) How do we serve gifted minority students? (b) What are their aca- demic needs? And (c) What are their interests? Over the years, many scholars of gifted educa- tion (Ford, Grantham, & Harris, 1996; Ford & Harris, 1999) have stressed the importance as well as the need for infusing multicultural education into the gifted education curricula. These scholars have also suggested that these fields combined of- fer great promise for meeting the pedagogical, cultural, and learning needs of students of color, especially in gifted education. In this article, we further the discourse by also stressing the impor- 125 THEORY INTO PRACTICE, 44 (2), 125137 Donna Y. Ford is the Betts Chair of Education and Hu- man Development at The Peabody College of Educa- tion. James L. Moore III is an Assistant Professor in the College of Education at The Ohio State University. Deborah A. Harmon is an Assistant Professor in the College of Education at Eastern Michigan University. Requests for reprints can be sent to James L. Moore III, College of Education, The Ohio State University, 1945 N. High Street., Columbus, OH 43210. E-mail: moore.1408@osu.edu tance of infusing multiculturalism and culturally relevant pedagogy in gifted education. As a con- ceptual framework or model, we present segments of Ford and Harris(1999) multicultural gifted ed- ucation curricula....
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16805890 - Donna Y. Ford James L. Moore III Deborah A....

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