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EBSCOhost11 - EBSCOhost 8:56 PM Back 12 page(s will be...

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4/21/09 8:56 PM EBSCOhost Page 1 of 10 http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/delivery?vid=8&hid=114&sid=2278bc3b-8b8a-4801-814a-3f40b0852f27%40sessionmgr107 Title: Authors: Source: Document Type: Subject Terms: Abstract: Full Text Word Count: ISSN: Accession Number: Database: Back 12 page(s) will be printed. Record: 1 Maximizing Achievement for Potentially Gifted and Talented and Regular Minority Students in a Primary Classroom. Uresti, Ronda Goertz, Jeanie Bernal, Ernesto M. Roeper Review; Fall2002, Vol. 25 Issue 1, p27, 5p, 1 chart Article *ACADEMIC achievement *GIFTED children *TALENTED students *MINORITY students Meeting the cognitive, emotional, and social needs of young, culturally and linguistically different (CLD) children in an inclusive classroom can be a challenge. A teacher used selected parts of the Autonomous Learner Model (Betts, 1985) with children in a first grade ESL classroom, where half the students were English-language learners, to promote the educational progress of all the children and find potentially gifted CLD children early in their schooling. The first graders quickly learned independence, responsibility, resourcefulness, and higher order thinking skills. Their mean scores on norm-referenced achievement tests, while in the average range, were believed to be the highest of any first grade group in the recent history of the school. Several gifted children emerged from the group by the end of first grade. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Roeper Review is the property of Routledge and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts) 4598 02783193 8560340 Academic Search Complete Maximizing Achievement for Potentially Gifted and Talented and Regular Minority Students in a Primary Classroom Meeting the cognitive, emotional, and social needs of young, culturally and linguistically different (CLD) children in an inclusive classroom can be a challenge. A teacher used selected parts of the Autonomous Learner Model (Betts, 1985) with children in a first grade ESL classroom, where half the students were English-language learners, to promote the educational progress of all the children and find potentially gifted CLD children early in their schooling. The first graders quickly learned independence, responsibility, resourcefulness, and higher order thinking skills. Their mean scores on norm-referenced achievement tests, while in the average range, were believed to be the highest of
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4/21/09 8:56 PM EBSCOhost Page 2 of 10 http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/delivery?vid=8&hid=114&sid=2278bc3b-8b8a-4801-814a-3f40b0852f27%40sessionmgr107 any first grade group in the recent history of the school. Several gifted children emerged from the group by the end of first grade.
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