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Unformatted text preview: 4/21/09 8:55 PM EBSCOhost Page 1 of 19 http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/delivery?vid=8&hid=114&sid=2278bc3b-8b8a-4801-814a-3f40b0852f27%40sessionmgr107 Title: Authors: Source: Document Type: Subject Terms: Geographic Terms: Abstract: Full Text Word Count: ISSN: Accession Number: Database: Back 19 page(s) will be printed. Record: 1 Beyond Deficit Thinking. Ford, Donna Y. Harris III, J. John Tyson, Cynthia A. Trotman, Michelle Frazier Roeper Review; Winter2002, Vol. 24 Issue 2, p52, 7p, 4 charts Article *GIFTED children -- Education *MINORITY students UNITED States Nationally, African American students are underrepresented in gifted education programs, and educators everywhere seek ways to identify more gifted Black students. This article addresses a central question in gifted education: How can we recruit and retain more African American students in our gifted programs? The authors review factors affecting the persistent underrepresentation of Black students in gifted education and offer suggestions for recruiting and retaining these able students. The authors' major premise is that a deficit orientation held by educators hinders access to gifted programs for diverse students. This thinking hinders the ability and willingness of educators to recognize the strengths of African American students. Too often, educators interpret differences as deficits, dysfunctions, and disadvantages: thus, many diverse students gain the at risk label. We contend that educators must move beyond a deficit orientation in order to recognize the strengths of African American students. Changing our thinking about differences among children holds great promise for recruiting and retaining culturally diverse students in gifted education. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Roeper Review is the property of Routledge and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts) 7202 02783193 6997508 Academic Search Complete Beyond Deficit Thinking Providing Access for Gifted African American Students Nationally, African American students are underrepresented in gifted education programs, and educators everywhere seek ways to identify more gifted Black students. This article addresses a central question in gifted education: How can we recruit and retain more African American students in our gifted programs? The authors review factors affecting the persistent underrepresentation of 4/21/09 8:55 PM EBSCOhost Page 2 of 19 http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/delivery?vid=8&hid=114&sid=2278bc3b-8b8a-4801-814a-3f40b0852f27%40sessionmgr107 Black students in gifted education and offer suggestions for recruiting and retaining these able...
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This note was uploaded on 10/07/2009 for the course EDP 300 taught by Professor West during the Spring '09 term at West Chester.

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Ford7b - 4/21/09 8:55 PM EBSCOhost Page 1 of 19

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