111b - Gifted Child Quarterly http:/gcq.sagepub.com The...

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http://gcq.sagepub.com Gifted Child Quarterly DOI: 10.1177/001698620504900203 2005; 49; 111 Gifted Child Quarterly David F. Lohman Perspective The Role of Nonverbal Ability Tests in Identifying Academically Gifted Students: An Aptitude http://gcq.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/49/2/111 The online version of this article can be found at: Published by: http://www.sagepublications.com On behalf of: National Association for Gifted Children can be found at: Gifted Child Quarterly Additional services and information for http://gcq.sagepub.com/cgi/alerts Email Alerts: http://gcq.sagepub.com/subscriptions Subscriptions: http://www.sagepub.com/journalsReprints.nav Reprints: http://www.sagepub.com/journalsPermissions.nav Permissions: http://gcq.sagepub.com/cgi/content/refs/49/2/111 Citations by Katherine Prammer on April 21, 2009 http://gcq.sagepub.com Downloaded from
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I first learned about nonverbal ability tests in the early 1970s when I was taught how to administer many of these tests to hearing-impaired students at the school for the deaf where I was working. By the mid-1970s I was in graduate school working on a research project that aimed to understand the cognitive processes people used when attempting to solve items on ability tests of all sorts. The Role of Nonverbal Ability Tests in Identifying Academically Gifted Students: An Aptitude Perspective David F. Lohman The University of Iowa ABSTRACT The first goal of this article is to discuss the role of nonverbal ability tests in the identification of aca- demically gifted children. I note that most nonverbal tests measure verbally mediated cognitive processes, that they are neither “culture free” nor “culture fair,” and that we have known these facts for a very long time. I show that selecting students for gifted and tal- ented programs on the basis of such tests would exclude the majority of the most academically accomplished students in all ethnic groups. The sec- ond goal is to propose a better method for identifying gifted students. I argue that the critical issue is readi- ness for a particular type of educational opportunity. The cognitive aspects of readiness are evidenced first in students’ levels of knowledge and skill in particular domains and secondarily in their abilities to reason in the symbol systems used to communicate new knowledge in these domains. This applies to both minority and majority students. Therefore, the most academically talented minority students are those who show the strongest current achievement in par- ticular domains and the best ability to reason in the symbol systems required for the acquisition of new knowledge in those domains. I also argue that, although current accomplishment can be measured on a common scale, judgments about potential must always be made relative to circumstances.
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This note was uploaded on 10/07/2009 for the course EDP 300 taught by Professor West during the Spring '09 term at West Chester.

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111b - Gifted Child Quarterly http:/gcq.sagepub.com The...

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