19b - Gifted Child Quarterly http/gcq.sagepub.com Review of...

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http://gcq.sagepub.com Gifted Child Quarterly DOI: 10.1177/001698620504900103 2005; 49; 19 Gifted Child Quarterly David F. Lohman of High-Scoring White, Black, and Hispanic Students? Review of Naglieri and Ford (2003): Does the Naglieri Nonverbal Ability Test Identify Equal Proportions http://gcq.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/49/1/19 The online version of this article can be found at: Published by: http://www.sagepublications.com On behalf of: National Association for Gifted Children can be found at: Gifted Child Quarterly Additional services and information for http://gcq.sagepub.com/cgi/alerts Email Alerts: http://gcq.sagepub.com/subscriptions Subscriptions: http://www.sagepub.com/journalsReprints.nav Reprints: http://www.sagepub.com/journalsPermissions.nav Permissions: http://gcq.sagepub.com/cgi/content/refs/49/1/19 Citations by Katherine Prammer on April 21, 2009 http://gcq.sagepub.com Downloaded from
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In a recent article in this journal, Naglieri and Ford (2003) claimed that Black and Hispanic students were as likely to earn high scores on the Naglieri Nonverbal Ability Test (NNAT; Naglieri, 1997a) as White stu- dents. Because of this, they argued that this test is the preferred measure of ability for identifying gifted chil- dren, especially over ability tests that also have verbal and quantitative sections. They argue that, because verbal and quantitative abilities are developed through school- ing, tests that measure these abilities would be inappro- priate for identifying academically gifted minority stu- dents. Strong claims have been made for the NNAT. The test is said to be culture fair (Naglieri, 1997b); to show, at most, small and inconsequential mean differences between minority and White students (Naglieri & Ronning, 2000a); to predict achievement, as well as measures of ability that contain both verbal and nonver- bal content (Naglieri, 2003b; Naglieri & Ronning, 2000b); and, finally, to identify equal numbers of high- Review of Naglieri and Ford (2003): Does the Naglieri Nonverbal Ability Test Identify Equal Proportions of High-Scoring White, Black, and Hispanic Students? David F. Lohman University of Iowa ABSTRACT In a recent article in this journal, Naglieri and Ford (2003) claimed that Black and Hispanic stu- dents are as likely to earn high scores on the Naglieri Nonverbal Ability Test (NNAT; Naglieri, 1997a) as White students. However, the sample that Naglieri and Ford used was not repre- sentative of the U.S. school population as a whole and was quite unrepresentative of ethnic sub- groups within that population. For example, only 5.6% of the children in their sample were from urban school districts, and both Black and Hispanic students were relatively more likely to be from high socioeconomic status (SES) families than were White families. Further, the mean and standard deviation in the sample differed signifi- cantly from the NNAT fall test norms, which were based on the same data. Finally, White- Black and White-Hispanic differences reported by Naglieri and Ford were smaller than those reported by Naglieri and Ronning (2000a) in a previous analysis of the same data set in which stu-
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This note was uploaded on 10/07/2009 for the course EDP 300 taught by Professor West during the Spring '09 term at West Chester.

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19b - Gifted Child Quarterly http/gcq.sagepub.com Review of...

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