Great3 - Gifted Child Quarterly http/gcq.sagepub.com Nondiscriminatory Assessment Considerations for Gifted Education Laurice M Joseph and Donna Y

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http://gcq.sagepub.com Gifted Child Quarterly DOI: 10.1177/001698620605000105 2006; 50; 42 Gifted Child Quarterly Laurice M. Joseph and Donna Y. Ford Nondiscriminatory Assessment: Considerations for Gifted Education http://gcq.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/50/1/42 The online version of this article can be found at: Published by: http://www.sagepublications.com On behalf of: National Association for Gifted Children can be found at: Gifted Child Quarterly Additional services and information for http://gcq.sagepub.com/cgi/alerts Email Alerts: http://gcq.sagepub.com/subscriptions Subscriptions: http://www.sagepub.com/journalsReprints.nav Reprints: http://www.sagepub.com/journalsPermissions.nav Permissions: http://gcq.sagepub.com/cgi/content/refs/50/1/42 Citations by Katherine Prammer on April 21, 2009 http://gcq.sagepub.com Downloaded from
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There is a legacy of research, as well as theories and opinions that are critical of the practice of applying stan- dardized tests to linguistically, ethnically, and culturally diverse populations. The central focus in the debates, par- ticularly of those who oppose the use of standardized tests with diverse groups, is on the issue of fairness and the dis- criminatory impact of standardized tests. It has been con- sistently argued that such tests contribute to the underrepresentation of diverse students in gifted educa- tion and their overrepresentation in special education placements. Standardized tests are used extensively, and sometimes exclusively, to screen, identify, and place stu- dents in gifted education classes and services (Council of State Directors of Programs for the Gifted and the National Association for Gifted Children, 2003). And despite cautions against the exclusive use of such tests for identifying gifted students (e.g., National Association for Gifted Children [NAGC], 2001), many districts con- tinue to use a single test and strict cutoff scores to iden- tify gifted students, according to data collected from state departments of education (Council of State Directors). The implications of using a single test, strict cutoff scores, and tests alone (without other means of assessment) for identification and placement is indefensible. For instance, gifted children have often been identified through the use of a cutoff score on an intelligence test such as the Wechsler or Binet, or through a group intel- ligence test such as the Slosson or OLSAT (Sparrow & Nondiscriminatory Assessment: Considerations for Gifted Education Laurice M. Joseph Donna Y. Ford Ohio State University Vanderbilt University ABSTRACT Nondiscriminatory assessment practices have been proposed as a model of assessment for individuals of diverse cultures who are suspected as having a dis- ability. This paper presents the use of nondiscrimina- tory assessment practices in evaluating students of diverse cultures who may be identified as gifted.
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This note was uploaded on 10/07/2009 for the course EDP 300 taught by Professor West during the Spring '09 term at West Chester.

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Great3 - Gifted Child Quarterly http/gcq.sagepub.com Nondiscriminatory Assessment Considerations for Gifted Education Laurice M Joseph and Donna Y

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