256 - Gifted Child Quarterly http:/gcq.sagepub.com...

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http://gcq.sagepub.com Gifted Child Quarterly DOI: 10.1177/0016986207302720 2007; 51; 256 Gifted Child Quarterly Dona Matthews and Julian Kitchen Schools School-Within-a-School Gifted Programs: Perceptions of Students and Teachers in Public Secondary http://gcq.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/51/3/256 The online version of this article can be found at: Published by: http://www.sagepublications.com On behalf of: National Association for Gifted Children can be found at: Gifted Child Quarterly Additional services and information for http://gcq.sagepub.com/cgi/alerts Email Alerts: http://gcq.sagepub.com/subscriptions Subscriptions: http://www.sagepub.com/journalsReprints.nav Reprints: http://www.sagepub.com/journalsPermissions.nav Permissions: http://gcq.sagepub.com/cgi/content/refs/51/3/256 Citations by Katherine Prammer on April 21, 2009 http://gcq.sagepub.com Downloaded from
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256 Gifted Child Quarterly Volume 51 Number 3 Summer 2007 256-271 © 2007 National Association for Gifted Children 10.1177/0016986207302720 http://gcq.sagepub.com hosted at http://online.sagepub.com School-Within-a-School Gifted Programs: Perceptions of Students and Teachers in Public Secondary Schools Dona Matthews Hunter College, City University of New York Julian Kitchen Brock University, St. Catharines, Ontario Abstract: The authors conduct open-ended surveys of 530 students and teachers in three publicly funded schools with different approaches to providing a high-ability “school-within-a-school”: a gifted program, an international bac- calaureate program, and a high-ability program with a science focus. Overall, the authors find that teachers and students in all of these gifted programs express strong satisfaction with their academic programs. At the same time, however, all groups (students and teachers in gifted and regular programs at all three schools) express concerns about the relationship between the special gifted programs and the schools within which they are housed. Based on an analysis of stakeholders’ concerns and suggestions in the contexts of the different schools’ approaches to integration, suggestions are made for and questions are raised about fostering a positive school climate in secondary schools that offer programming for high-ability learners. Putting the Research to Use: One of the most urgent challenges within the field of gifted education is to resolve the apparent conflict between meeting the special learning needs of gifted students and promoting social equity. Exceptionally able learners have special needs that cannot be met without differentiating the pace, depth, and com- plexity of the educational programming normally offered at the student’s age and grade level. At the same time, however, these students must coexist with others, and it is best for everyone if the coexistence is experienced as mutually beneficial rather than as antagonistic and elitist.
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This note was uploaded on 10/07/2009 for the course EDP 300 taught by Professor West during the Spring '09 term at West Chester.

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256 - Gifted Child Quarterly http:/gcq.sagepub.com...

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